How to Repair or Replace RV and Camper Trailer Floors

Updated on January 26, 2019
Randy Godwin profile image

Randy is a lifelong lover of the outdoors and especially camping. His articles are intended to help the RVer save money and time on repairs.

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Soft Spots on the Floor?

A soft spot in the floor of your RV—whether it's a motorhome, pop-up, or camper trailer—is something you simply cannot ignore. The soft spot usually means a leaking roof or perhaps plumbing problems, either now or at some time in the past. Either way, a repair project is in your near future.

But can a DIY owner handle an RV floor repair job? Of course you can, and I'll show you how, from start to finish.

Dutchman travel trailer with a damaged floor.
Dutchman travel trailer with a damaged floor.

Assessing the Damage

This Dutchman camper trailer had at least two previous owners and has been in the hands of the present owners for two years. Shortly after the purchase, soft spots were noticed in the kitchen area floor. These spots have gotten worse and have spread almost into the carpeted sitting area. The table base was screwed to the floor which was so soft the table was barely supported.

At some time in the past, there was a plumbing leak. It is suspected a waterline supplying the sink or water heater had ruptured and soaked the floor. This was probably due to freezing temperatures while the camper trailer was left with the water hooked up. Whatever the reason, it thoroughly soaked the particleboard used as a base for the floor covering. A look inside of the base cabinet revealed the original vinyl floor covering which had been replaced by vinyl stick-on tile.

This quick fix might have been satisfactory on some models, but not in this case. Particle board is notorious for falling apart if exposed to water. In fact, it can swell just from the moisture in the air over a long period of time.

Removing the Bad Flooring

Badly deteriorated floor.
Badly deteriorated floor.
Booth unscrewed from the wall and floor.
Booth unscrewed from the wall and floor.
Rotten wood and styrofoam removed.
Rotten wood and styrofoam removed.
Floor cleaned and ready for repair.
Floor cleaned and ready for repair.
Joining point between new and old flooring.
Joining point between new and old flooring.

How to Replace the Floor

Before the floor could be removed, the table and booth had to be dismantled and stored elsewhere. The position of each bench was carefully marked and measured to ensure proper position when replaced.

The bench with the back to the bar top contained electrical wires for the running light wires which were cut and would be spliced after the repair job was completed. The tiles pulled up easily, as the glue had deteriorated on the damp particleboard. After removing a section of particleboard with the reciprocating saw, it was easy to see what had occurred.

The only support in the floor consisted of a few 1 ½ inch square wood beams with Styrofoam in between them. Beneath this was only thin metal over a few sparsely-spaced steel support bracing. There was a steel beam under the booth/table area which had not been used for a wood beam floor joist. Very poor management of floor support in this design.

A reciprocating saw was used to cut the particleboard away from the walls and cabinets. Care is needed to keep from cutting through the outer sheet metal on the bottom. A floor heating ventran the length of the unit and was flattened by the weight of those walking on the soft floor. It was almost impossible to keep from cutting this aluminum vent during the floor removal but this is easy to repair.

Tip: Cutting a straight line into the area separating the sound wood from the bad will make matching the new wood edge easier.

The removal of the Styrofoam was the worst part of the job as it was glued to the metal covering and to the particleboard. A small scraper was used to remove the remnants and the whole area was vacuumed clean.

The stick-on tile had sealed the moisture into the floor and had slowly deteriorated the particleboard. There was no place for the moisture to go. This moisture had been trapped inside for years and finally the damage became noticeable.

Corroded heat duct repaired with aluminum sheeting. Extra floor joists added.
Corroded heat duct repaired with aluminum sheeting. Extra floor joists added.
Repaired duct and joists.
Repaired duct and joists.
Insulation added and duct protected by roofing felt.
Insulation added and duct protected by roofing felt.
Attaching the new plywood flooring with screws.
Attaching the new plywood flooring with screws.
Ready for the floor covering.
Ready for the floor covering.

Finishing the Job

Rebuilding

  • After the cleanup, the rebuilding process begins. Extra wood floor joists were added over the steel beams beneath the floor. Joists were also added beneath the cabinets and along the line of the remaining floor at the sitting area. It is important to support every edge of the new plywood for greater strength and stability.
  • Extra joists were screwed along the walls into the old, but still solid, wood beams. Cross beams were also added to further strengthen the floor support. The old heating vent was straightened and reinforced with sheet aluminum and self tapping sheet metal screws.
  • Aluminum adhesive duct repair tape was used to seal all repairs and to repair the cuts made during floor removal. An extra wood joist was added along the side of the vent to prevent the damage happening again.
  • Roofingfelt was used to cover the aluminum heating vent because the treated plywood used for the floor replacement will corrode aluminum over a period of time. The Styrofoam insulation was replaced by ordinary thick fiberglass insulation. Any rusted spots on the floor was treated with a good quality paint to prevent further corrosion.
  • Coated deck screws were utilized to attach the ¾ inch plywood to the beams and to match up with the remaining ¾ inch particleboard. The screws were countersunk and filled with putty so as not to show beneath the new floor covering. It may be necessary to sand or otherwise flatten out uneven areas, as these floors are hard to get completely smooth.

Recovering

  • Because of the many different angles and protrusions, stick-on tile was the easiest and most mistake-free covering to use. Unless you have a very square and angle-free area, it is hard to cut solid vinyl flooring without making a mistake. If you desire this type of flooring, it would be best to hire a professional to do the job for you.
  • Ceramic tile is not recommended because of the flexing of the unit while in transport and because of the excess weight involved. Other coverings, including carpet and wood, may be used if desired. If vinyl tile is used, be sure to plan the edges carefully to avoid having to cut tiny slivers of tile along the walls. The molding will only cover about ½ inch when put down.
  • A carpet bar or wooden threshold may be used to cover the joint between the new wood and the old. Often, this joint is uneven because of the swelling of the old floor but the aforementioned products will hide the difference. It only remains to replace the booth and table and cover the cracks around the floor and walls with quarter round molding to dress up the new floor.
  • The floor in your particular model may be constructed differently, but the method of replacement is basically the same. Use as much support as you can to support your new floor and you can enjoy the fruit of your labors for many years to come.

Installing the Tile and Other Finishing Touches

Installing the tile.
Installing the tile.
Fully tiled floor.
Fully tiled floor.
Booth and table back in place.
Booth and table back in place.
The finished floor.
The finished floor.
Joint between new floor and carpet.
Joint between new floor and carpet.

This article is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge. Content is for informational or entertainment purposes only and does not substitute for personal counsel or professional advice in business, financial, legal, or technical matters.

Any questions you have or problems you may encounter may be addressed here.

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    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      7 weeks ago from Southern Georgia

      Kris, I didn't use styrofoam. I filled the space with insulation and covered it with plywood for the floor.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Kris 

      7 weeks ago

      I was wondering did you remove osb that was stuck to styrofoam? If so where did you find styrofoam to put back down?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Denise, yes you can place plywood for temporary flooring until your house is being repaired. Watch for mold though.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Denise Hamilton 

      2 months ago

      We have a trailer that has extensive water damage on subfloor from harvey, and imelda. Is there any way to just put a piece of plywood down to get us through for a month or so while our current house is torn down and replaced??

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Carolyn, I have absolutely zero experience with such a project, but ir sounds doable. Let me know if you install such a heating element.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Carolyn Rill 

      2 months ago

      Hi Randy. Thanks for the important info! l'm considering laying a heating element under the main floor that l'll be replacing soon in my 30' Shasta 5th wheel. Have you had any experience with this type of system, and if so, do you think it's worth it to go thru the extra expense and trouble for it? Thanks in advance! Carolyn

    • profile image

      Donnamilner 

      2 months ago

      Excellent instructions!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Kim, there's no other way to repair a soft spot than removing the floor covering to see what needs replacing. Hopefully it's only a small area. Let me know if you need further advice. :)

      Randy

    • profile image

      Kim Caroon 

      2 months ago

      Hi Randy. I have a Dutchman 2005 and noticed a soft spot in the master bed room. How can that be fixed?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      3 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Cyn, that is good news! It should save you a lot of time and expense.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Cyn Mobley 

      3 months ago

      All good news so far, Randy. After reading your article, I took up part of the lay flat vinyl and it look like the area under the sink and fridge and stove is still solid! AND it looks like it's only half the floor that's bad. The forward half of the main cabin is solid and the plywood nice and light. I'm going to take up the rest of the vinyl tomorrow and get everything good and dry in this heat wave we're having.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      3 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Cyn, thanks for reading and feel free to ask if you run into any problems. Good luck with the repairs!

      Randy

    • profile image

      Cyn Mobley 

      3 months ago

      Thank you for this article. My 1998 Safari Trek has soft floors almost all throughout from a puncture in the roof. That's been repaired and all is dry, but these floors have got to be replaced. I had several questions, particularly about how to handle the cabinet/sink/fridge area, but I think you've answered those in the comments.

      I'm HOPING we don't need to replace floors under the cabinets and fridge! Any additional pointers on what to look for, in addition to the location of the HW heater?

      I'll probably have to hire someone to do this, but now I know what to ask and what to expect and how to tell if they know what they're doing.

      Just wanted to say thanks for the article.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Jackie, it depends on if you want to do the job yourself and have the time. Depending on the size of the camper, materials can cost up to two grand or so.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Jackie L 

      4 months ago

      I was given a 2007 travel trailer. It has sat for a few years. The entire floor throughout the trailer is soft and spongy. If you can’t find a metal joust to stand on, you will go through. Is it worth fixing or not. To take it to a shop will be 5000-6000 dollars.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Dave, I didn't encounter much in the way of wires or plumbing doing my repairs. I repaired some vents in the floor which had collapsed though.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Dave Thompson 

      4 months ago

      Randy, I have a 2005 Gulfstream 38' motorcoach in which the hallway floor is getting soft. I have been parked in Orlando now for three years, living full time in the RV. Need to replace the subfloor. Do you normally have wires, plumbing down the hall to worry about when removing the flooring?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Christina, yes if you use correct thickness and it doesn't make the floor too high.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Christina 

      4 months ago

      Hi. Im redoing a 69 moble scout. The back area is very soft due to water damage. Can I use the insulation sheets on the floor instead of the batting??

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      David, I cannot tell you what size plywood is in your camper floor. You'll have to cut a piece out to find out for sure.

      Randy

    • profile image

      David Woodard 

      4 months ago

      I have a 05 Gulfstream camper i would like to know what size plywood is in the floor

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Oliver, yes if the joists are still okay you can do that.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Oliver 

      4 months ago

      Hi Randy, thanks for posting the info.

      I have a 2008 Wildwood LE 30BHBS and when i got the camper noticed a soft spot in the main floor right under a stapled carpet that sits in front of the slideout. The seller tild.me his cane went through it. But this year when i open it up for the season i noticed that stapled carpet strip was wet and nkw another section is soft. I looked underneath and the subfloor looks exploded. I assume this are got wet and froze. The damage appears to be limited to between the outer metal frame rail and the first wooden joist. About 8 inches wide, 24 inches long.

      Could i just pull that carpet, cut out the bad section of floor and patch it? The joist is fine, maybe screw a sister board to it and use it as a ledge for the patch piece?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Discoloration is okay as long as the wood is sound, Laurie. But be sure it's sound, especially under the tub.

      Randy

    • profile image

      laurie 

      4 months ago

      Hello, I have a 93 gulfstream ultra 26ft rv well everything is water damaged it seems. I am 3rd owner. I have almost completely gutted the interior. I'm down to the sub flooring which is rotted thru in some places. if it is discolored and dark but not "mushy" should I leave it alone or replace it? If it's under the bathtub? This is turning out to be way more than I expected. Thank you for any advice. and thank you for all the knowledge you share.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Terry, let know If Ican help.

      Randy

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      Terry Hasty 

      4 months ago

      I was just given a canned ham. Don’t know what the make or model is yet. I pick it up tomorrow. But it is going to need this from what I could see.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      5 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Johnny, it depends on the camper construction. How are planning to fix the warp underneath the floor?

      Randy

    • profile image

      Johnny! 

      5 months ago

      I have a plywood floor in my rv, however I have a piece in the kitchen that seems to have a small warp ! My question is can I get to the underside of my floor from underneath my rv

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      6 months ago from Southern Georgia

      John, way too expensive and you can fix it yourself. Is it similar to the camper in the article?

    • profile image

      John 

      6 months ago

      Randy I have a Dutchmen 2008 it has a soft spot at the door and it makes the step weak is there a blue print of the sub floor I Ned too try to fix it I'm parity handy thay want 3000.00 to fix it it's to old to put that kind of money in it is a Kodaik honda51@aol.com think you John

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      6 months ago from Southern Georgia

      De, yes if you want the walls to be sturdy enough to withstand travel better and more soundproof.

      Randy

    • profile image

      De 

      6 months ago

      We have to replace the walls in our bathroom we are planning to use FRP should we use Luan behind it?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      6 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Angie, more than likely the moisture is entering around some exterior door or window--or even the roof flashing--and draining down through the wall and in to the floor area.

      Check around the window and doors and the flashing to see if you can find the leak.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Angie 

      6 months ago

      I have an 07 rv with a soft spot in the middle of the floor, no plumbing near it no inside wall or ceiling damage but the underneath of the rev black liner is very wet, where can this leak be coming from?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      7 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Becky, send me a photo via the "contact author" at the top of the page.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Becky Bagwell 

      7 months ago

      Need too replace a wall I my RV a slide out in the bedroom ..needing help on how too do it!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      7 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Camilla, if the camper isn't being moved, then yes you can use the tile, but be sure to use tile board over the floor.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Camilla 

      7 months ago

      HI Randy,

      Would it be a bad idea to put some thin brick tiles on the floor of a kitchen in a 1979 avion camper? It is being renovated for living in full time and shouldn't be moved too often but I am worried about cracking...

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      7 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Kevin, Not sure about that. Why not use some luan or other thin plywood to make the floor the correct height?

    • profile image

      Kevin Thomas 

      7 months ago

      I'm replacing the thick laminate flooring and carpet, with vinyl planks. The laminate is thicker and I'm worried about the slide out roller now being on a slightly lower surface. Do I need to keep the level the same or will the roller adjust?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      8 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Mykayla, this took my friend and I about 5 days to complete, including the new tile flooring. But then, we're accustomed to such projects.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Mykayla 

      8 months ago

      How long did this take you? Days, weekend, months?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      8 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Denise, if it's a fiberglass or acrylic tub is will be rather flexible.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Denise Brown 

      8 months ago

      I just bought a used camper and I would like to know if the flooring in the tub should it be soft or hard?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      9 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Karen, I'm not familiar with how the couch is attached. If you'll send me a photo via email, I'll be glad to take a look. You can find my email by clicking the "Contact Author" icon at the top of this article.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Karin Trent 

      9 months ago

      I have a Thor Tahoe travel trailer with a manual couch slideout above floor that needs to be removed to repair floor underneath .Not sure how to remove it from the rails and cant find anything online and insight would be appreciated

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      9 months ago from Southern Georgia

      David, visit Lowe's Or Home Depot to see what activator is needed for you type tile. I's been several years since I last used an activator and there may be some improvements since then, Good luck on your repairs!

      Randy

    • profile image

      David Hall 

      9 months ago

      Randy, just now seeing this article, my wife and i have a RV that received water damage from the roof, we have a wall and floor to replace, below you mention a good adhesive activator, would you have a specific adhesive activator that you would recommend?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      14 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Gary, if you use a good adhesive activator before laying the tile, you won't have to worry about the temp variables.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Gary Snyder 

      14 months ago

      I'm wondering if using stick on tiles are the best way to go due to temperature extremes during the year. I get that they are easier to apply but do you sacrifice something else in return?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      15 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Marty, thanks for the BDay wishes! :) Every day is something to be grateful for.

      Randy

    • profile image

      MartyRose 

      15 months ago

      Hi Randy! I just Googled you to find this article, and read yesterday was your birthday! Happy Birthday +1 Randy! Hope it was GREAT!

    • profile image

      MartyRose 

      16 months ago

      Thanks Randy!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      16 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Marty, if you run into a problem, don't hesitate to contact me and I'll try to help. Good luck!

      Randy

    • profile image

      MartyRose 

      16 months ago

      Hi Randy!

      I've been reading this article over and over almost ever since you published it. The time has come for me to be brave and just do it. My whole floor has to be replaced. I have a 1988 Toyota Dolphin which is already gutted. Know you're familiar with some Toyotas. Just wondering if you have any other crumbs of wisdom to offer. Thanks in advance. Great article btw.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      16 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Roberson, I'm not familiar with the construction of your camper, but the walls usually are bolted over the existing floor. you may have to jack up the walls to replace the flooring.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Roberson 

      16 months ago

      HI Randy,

      Ive just purchased a 2005 kodiak by thor. the floors are rotted out. I am a home builder so I feel comfortable tackling the project but my concern is the floor system and how the weight is distributed on the outer wall.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      17 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Linda, try contact cement.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Linda sparrow 

      17 months ago

      Our mobile rv needs a vinyl piece of flooring clued down. What is the best glue to use

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      18 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Furay, you may try looking at some of the newer materials used in today's RVs.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Furay 

      18 months ago

      Hi Randy,

      This site has been so helpful! I am currently facing an issue with the floor rotting in my RV as well. Problem is, water is not leaking from the roof. The aluminum sheeting on the bottom has a hole. How would you tackle this issue? What is a better material? As the aluminum sheeting on the bottom and the roof seems to be very thin

      thank you!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      19 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Donald, they should be color coded. If not, you may have to use trial and error as I have no wiring diagrams.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Donald 

      19 months ago

      When I tore out end wall in rv I cut running light wires . Do you have picture how to wire them back

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      21 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Dane, I don't know who Jessi is, but I'll try and answer your questions.

      There shouldn't be any space between the walls and the floor. More than likely the toilet and/or the sink has flooded the area before.

      Whether the problem is major or not will depend on what you find when you get a closer look at the damage.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Dane Hughes 

      21 months ago

      Hi Jessi,

      Newbe here. I just replaced the toilet in my 2013 Freelander. I bumped a piece of molding at the floor wall junction, and I could see daylight between the wall and the floor. Checked the other side of the RV in the bedroom area and the same is true. Can't find anything on Google about this issue. Do I have a major problem or am I just so new at this that I do not really understand how these things are put together?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      22 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Jessi, I know there are many on the market and I have no experience with the newer wood preservatives. You'll have to do a bit of research or ask the people at Home Depot or Lowe's about your problem and the best treatment for it. Been out the business too long to give you better advice on this. Sorry!

      Randy

    • jessitom7911 profile image

      Jessi 

      22 months ago from Wisconsin

      Could you recommend a good wood preservative? There are so many on the market that it’s hard to choose.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      22 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Jessi, sounds like you do have a problem. More than likely the pipes froze and flooded the camper causing the damage.

      The wall studs are very important to the strength of the camper. You may be able to add more studs to the side of the old ones and get by with them. There is a wood preservative and strengthener you can coat the old wood with and this should prevent any future damage.

      If the area under cabinets isn't very large you can probably get by without replacing it unless the H/W heater is resting on it.

      Randy

    • jessitom7911 profile image

      Jessi 

      22 months ago from Wisconsin

      My husband and I recently purchased a 2004 Dutchmen with a soft spot on the floor by the back bunkroom. We are first time camper owners and did not do our research. We got it cheap and now we know why...water damage, major water damage. It almost looks like there was a fire and that part of the damage is from that...not really positive. We have ripped the floor out completely from the entire back room and have also taken out all of the floor joists so that they can be replaced. I have some questions and am hoping you have some answers!

      1. We can see that the bottom of the wall where it met the floor is rotted out as well. Can we get away with leaving this rotted wood there, as long as it has not travelled up the wall and the leak is fixed, or will the rot spread to the new wood? I know that we can install L brackets to support the wall, but my concern is that the moisture from the wet rotting wood will spread to the new wood and cause that to rot as well. Will this be an issue?

      2. We can see that the end of the joists that support the floor under the fridge/stove/cupboards area is rotted out. Because there is no foot traffic under the kitchen side, do we have to fully replace all of the rotted boards, or is there a way to get around that without compromising the integrity of the camper?

      3. I think that what I am basically asking is do you have to remove all of the rotted wood or is there a way to keep the rot contained, so that it does not spread to the new wood that we are putting in?

      What are your thoughts on wood filler/strengthener or an epoxy?

      Thanks for your help!!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      22 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Mike, I don't have any experience with using this type floor in a camper, but several people have told me they were going to. I haven't heard back from them on how it worked out.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Mike 

      22 months ago

      Hi Randy. Do you have any experience with anyone installing that new floating vinyl plank flooring in their trailer? I understand they want you to glue it down if it will be exposed to temperatures below freezing, but I was wondering if you know of anyone who has any experience with installing this as a floating floor. Thanks.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      23 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Mike, I don't see why you can't use this type of insulation if you prefer it. No matter what type of stick on ties you install, make sure to coat the floor with a good glue activation agent shortly before the application of the tiles.

      Good luck on the repairs and thanks for reading, Mike.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Mike M 

      23 months ago

      Randy, I have a 2014 Heartland Wilderness. I had soft floors in bathroom, so I cut out a square in bathroom. The pressboard was totally soaked due to a leak in shower plumbing. I have gutted the bathroom and removed pressboard and foam insulation. I have added two new floor supports. Can I use polystyrene insulation for floors? Also can I use vinyl tiles bought from local box store for flooring? Any special tricks for installing vinyl in camper?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      23 months ago from Southern Georgia

      I used pressure treated plywood, Stan. Didn't want to do this again in MY lifetime either.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Stan A 

      23 months ago

      I found this very useful for my up coming task of floor replacement due to a leaky wheel well. What I would like to know is what type of 3/4 plywood did you use? Plywood is very expensive here in Ontario and I would not like to do it again in my life time

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      23 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Michael, examine the old floor first and take a few pics if you're not sure about the reconstruction. Good luck and feel free to consult me it you run into problems.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Michael Titus 

      23 months ago

      We have a columbus model 385BH 5th wheel with sagging floor. Can we repair this ourself and do you have any tips for us before we start?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Marsha, having a metal covering under the floor is not a necessity, and is sometimes susceptible to holding moisture. If the camper roof is sound then the chance of the floor being exposed to moisture is very low.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Marsha 

      2 years ago

      Thanks for such a great resource! I bought a Zeppelin Z310 recently to live in for a while and discovered after connecting and running water through the lines that there were several leaks (new and old). I cut away the splash guard under the RV to find no metal, only plywood, all of which appeared to have been wet for a loooong time. Basically, I have to replace the ENTIRE floor throughout 60-70% of the RV. Your instructions for replacing the floor show you had a metal bottom in your RV. Any advice on this repair job, given there's no metal and everything has to be replaced?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Page, I don't believe there would be any advantage to having the trailer on jacks other than being steadier to work on.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Page 

      2 years ago

      Maybe the wrong thread for this question, but can you tell me if we need to level our trailer on jacks or have it resting on tires to put all new siding on?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey JSD, coating the hambox with a good wood preservative is the best way to go, but still I'd protect the exterior by storing it under a shelter during the off season. If possible, use PT or marine plywood for any replacement of the old materials.

      Randy

    • profile image

      JSD in Montana 

      2 years ago

      Hey! Great convo below. I'm redoing a 1965 Forester 14' and I have been doing the same jacking the shell off the frame to fit the floor properly underneath. The whole floor was rotten. The next project is going to be removing the interior AND exterior walls for the purpose of going all wood. Eventually I'll get to my question... I want to use 1/4" tongue and groove both interior and exterior. The exterior is my concern. I was thinking about laying out tar paper over the top of the frame and overlap over the sides some. As I connect the boards I'll lay a bead of clear silicone between them. Then I'll finish the job with deck waterproofing stain. My question is - will that be enough to prevent water damage in the future? Or should I go crazy with sealing it? Also, it appears some of the edge framing is made out of some junky oldschool plywoodish material and it's not in the best shape. What do I do about that? It's in the canned ham style so I am concerned about getting it right to shape.

      Thanks!

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Mark, I usually add some "L" shaped steel brackets along the exterior walls and to the new flooring to increase the stability of the walls when traveling. This allows one to simply replace the flooring up to and not beneath the walls.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Mark Henley 

      2 years ago

      Randy, great article, thanks for posting. I recently replaced almost my entire floor in a West Coast Trailer toyhauler which had many weak spots due to water intrusion. The roof appears to be recently repaired, so I assume the damage has developed over time. I used a toe kick saw to cut the flooring away from the walls, and replaced with some 5/8 plywood coated with Thompson's water seal on both sides, to offer some protection in the future. My floor is now nice and solid, but I'm wondering, have I compromised the structural integrity overall ? All appears fine sitting in my driveway, but rolling down the road at 55 mph is not when i want to figure out there's a problem ! I wonder if I should have jacked up every wall and laid the new flooring underneath it. That would be a huge job, but much easier now than later..

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Maryann, you'll have to remove a section of the bad flooring to see how much area to remove. There's no easy way to tell unless you have the specs from the maker.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Maryann 

      2 years ago

      I have a 2008 Denali camper with a weak floor in my kitchen. The water holding tank is under this area and need to know how much room I have to cut to replace the weak area

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Mary, your husband is right, this is a time consuming and often labor intensive repair job. Nevertheless, if you have the time and energy you can repair the floor yourself. As for the floor under the walls, you can simply go right up to the walls with the new floor as long as you add some L shaped steel brackets to hold the walls down to the new floor. Good luck!

      Randy

    • profile image

      mary 

      2 years ago

      our floor is rotten including the side areas under wall how do we replace this with new floors. The are from bath room is most likely bad and extends to area under fridge cabinet and stove most likely so should we remove them and do whole flooor or just rweplace up to this area. Iam beside my self husband says we cant do that i say we can still unsur about the rotted wood along camper edge?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Mikai, what info do you require?

    • profile image

      Mikai 

      2 years ago

      Hi, I need some advice. I'm replacing the floor in my 1971 camper

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Wayne, the only way to replace the floor joists under the walls is to jack up the walls one section at a time. I assume you have aluminum/Styrofoam sandwich type material used for the walls. Just be sure to use plenty of "L" shaped brackets to securely reattach the walls to the new floor.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Wayne IL 

      2 years ago

      Hi Randy,

      I have an 89 Play Mor. The floor in the bedroom is completely rotted out. How do I replace the rotten joists under the walls? The joists under the walls are in extremely bad shape.

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Yes you can remove and replace the counter and the floor underneath but it may be a lot of work to do so, Brandon. Good luck on the repairs. :)

      Randy

    • profile image

      Brandon Sparks 

      2 years ago

      I have a 09 hideout . The slide out has been leaking all winter long which has warped my floor under my slide out and under my counter which has caused the counter to raise up . is there a way to take a section of my counter out so i can cut the old flooring out and replace it ?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Deb, try looking on EBay at campers for sale. There are usually some old ones with pics of the interior inmost cases.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Deb 

      2 years ago

      Hi RANDY just bought a 1977 Jayco trailer how do I find out the original design as several have pondered in it How do I obtain pictures?

    • Randy Godwin profile imageAUTHOR

      Randy Godwin 

      2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Kimber, you may have to use a strip of carpet to cover the area where the slide comes in. I have little experience in using stick-on tile in slide-out applications of this sort.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Kimber 

      2 years ago

      Sure! Thanks for asking. I put down vinyl stick tile on the flat part of the slide and now am putting on the repaired part of the main floor. The transition, or mechanics where the slide comes in ( the metal black hump that the slide comes over when we bring in the slide) is what I don't know how to cover. It was originally carpet. I have seen where some who used laminate flooring put a transition board. However the peel and stick is only 2mm thick. I think if I put another piece over the transition it would just roll up or break when we pull the slide in.

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