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How to Repair or Replace RV & Camper Trailer Floors

Updated on March 25, 2016
Randy Godwin profile image

Randy is a life long lover of the outdoors and especially camping. This article is intended to help the RVer save money and time on repairs.

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Soft Spots on the Floor?

A soft spot in the floor of your RV— whether it's a motorhome, pop-up, or camper trailer— is something you simply cannot ignore. The soft spot usually means a leaking roof or perhaps plumbing problems, either now or at some time in the past. Either way, a repair project is in your near future.

But can a DIY owner handle an RV floor repair job? Of course you can, and I'll show you how, from start to finish.

Dutchman travel trailer with a damaged floor.
Dutchman travel trailer with a damaged floor.

Assessing the Damage

This Dutchman camper trailer had at least two previous owners and has been in the hands of the present owners for two years. Shortly after the purchase, soft spots were noticed in the kitchen area floor. These spots have gotten worse and have spread almost into the carpeted sitting area. The table base was screwed to the floor which was so soft the table was barely supported.

At some time in the past, there was a plumbing leak. It is suspected a waterline supplying the sink or water heater had ruptured and soaked the floor. This was probably due to freezing temperatures while the camper trailer was left with the water hooked up. Whatever the reason, it thoroughly soaked the particleboard used as a base for the floor covering. A look inside of the base cabinet revealed the original vinyl floor covering which had been replaced by vinyl stick-on tile.

This quick fix might have been satisfactory on some models, but not in this case. Particle board is notorious for falling apart if exposed to water. In fact, it can swell just from the moisture in the air over a long period of time.

Removing the Bad Flooring

Badly deteriorated floor.
Badly deteriorated floor.
Booth unscrewed from the wall and floor.
Booth unscrewed from the wall and floor.
Rotten wood and styrofoam removed.
Rotten wood and styrofoam removed.
Floor cleaned and ready for repair.
Floor cleaned and ready for repair.
Joining point between new and old flooring.
Joining point between new and old flooring.

How to Replace the Floor

Before the floor could be removed, the table and booth had to be dismantled and stored elsewhere. The position of each bench was carefully marked and measured to ensure proper position when replaced.

The bench with the back to the bar top contained electrical wires for the running light wires which were cut and would be spliced after the repair job was completed. The tiles pulled up easily, as the glue had deteriorated on the damp particleboard. After removing a section of particleboard with the reciprocating saw, it was easy to see what had occurred.

The only support in the floor consisted of a few 1 ½ inch square wood beams with Styrofoam in between them. Beneath this was only thin metal over a few sparsely-spaced steel support bracing. There was a steel beam under the booth/table area which had not been used for a wood beam floor joist. Very poor management of floor support in this design.

A reciprocating saw was used to cut the particleboard away from the walls and cabinets. Care is needed to keep from cutting through the outer sheet metal on the bottom. A floor heating ventran the length of the unit and was flattened by the weight of those walking on the soft floor. It was almost impossible to keep from cutting this aluminum vent during the floor removal but this is easy to repair.

Tip: Cutting a straight line into the area separating the sound wood from the bad will make matching the new wood edge easier.

The removal of the Styrofoam was the worst part of the job as it was glued to the metal covering and to the particleboard. A small scraper was used to remove the remnants and the whole area was vacuumed clean.

The stick-on tile had sealed the moisture into the floor and had slowly deteriorated the particleboard. There was no place for the moisture to go. This moisture had been trapped inside for years and finally the damage became noticeable.

Corroded heat duct repaired with aluminum sheeting. Extra floor joists added.
Corroded heat duct repaired with aluminum sheeting. Extra floor joists added.
Repaired duct and joists.
Repaired duct and joists.
Insulation added and duct protected by roofing felt.
Insulation added and duct protected by roofing felt.
Attaching the new plywood flooring with screws.
Attaching the new plywood flooring with screws.
Ready for the floor covering.
Ready for the floor covering.

Finishing the Job

Rebuilding

  • After the cleanup, the rebuilding process begins. Extra wood floor joists were added over the steel beams beneath the floor. Joists were also added beneath the cabinets and along the line of the remaining floor at the sitting area. It is important to support every edge of the new plywood for greater strength and stability.
  • Extra joists were screwed along the walls into the old, but still solid, wood beams. Cross beams were also added to further strengthen the floor support. The old heating vent was straightened and reinforced with sheet aluminum and self tapping sheet metal screws.
  • Aluminum adhesive duct repair tape was used to seal all repairs and to repair the cuts made during floor removal. An extra wood joist was added along the side of the vent to prevent the damage happening again.
  • Roofingfelt was used to cover the aluminum heating vent because the treated plywood used for the floor replacement will corrode aluminum over a period of time. The Styrofoam insulation was replaced by ordinary thick fiberglass insulation. Any rusted spots on the floor was treated with a good quality paint to prevent further corrosion.
  • Coated deck screws were utilized to attach the ¾ inch plywood to the beams and to match up with the remaining ¾ inch particleboard. The screws were countersunk and filled with putty so as not to show beneath the new floor covering. It may be necessary to sand or otherwise flatten out uneven areas, as these floors are hard to get completely smooth.

Recovering

  • Because of the many different angles and protrusions, stick-on tile was the easiest and most mistake-free covering to use. Unless you have a very square and angle-free area, it is hard to cut solid vinyl flooring without making a mistake. If you desire this type of flooring, it would be best to hire a professional to do the job for you.
  • Ceramic tile is not recommended because of the flexing of the unit while in transport and because of the excess weight involved. Other coverings, including carpet and wood, may be used if desired. If vinyl tile is used, be sure to plan the edges carefully to avoid having to cut tiny slivers of tile along the walls. The molding will only cover about ½ inch when put down.
  • A carpet bar or wooden threshold may be used to cover the joint between the new wood and the old. Often, this joint is uneven because of the swelling of the old floor but the aforementioned products will hide the difference. It only remains to replace the booth and table and cover the cracks around the floor and walls with quarter round molding to dress up the new floor.
  • The floor in your particular model may be constructed differently, but the method of replacement is basically the same. Use as much support as you can to support your new floor and you can enjoy the fruit of your labors for many years to come.

Installing the Tile and Other Finishing Touches

Installing the tile.
Installing the tile.
Fully tiled floor.
Fully tiled floor.
Booth and table back in place.
Booth and table back in place.
The finished floor.
The finished floor.
Joint between new floor and carpet.
Joint between new floor and carpet.

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    • MikeNV profile image

      MikeNV 7 years ago from Henderson, NV

      I need to replace the carpeting, not the whole floor. But it seems like an impossible task because it looks like they put in the carpet then the cabinets and everything on top of that. So do you just cut out the carpet? Then how do you get it back under the cabinets. I'm afraid to do it because I know I can get it out, but not sure I could ever get it back in and look normal.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 7 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Mike, you will have to cut out the old carpet and use it for a pattern for the new carpet. Use quarter round or shoe molding along the bottom of the cabinets and walls to cover the edge of the new carpet. If the carpet meets other carpet or floor covering use a carpet bar or wood strip as in the pictures in this hub.

    • george 6 years ago

      i have a toy haul tohoe by thor 2004 im replacing the floor and i need to take the sink out so i can do under it how was the sink and the base put in so i can get it out

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello George. In most cases the sink cabinet is not removed when replacing the floor unless it is extremely decayed. Most of the time the cabinet(s)are built in such a way that removing them is very time consuming and, in some cases, hard to do without damaging them.

      It is easier to refloor up to the cabinets and replace the floor inside of them separately. Without seeing your particular model, it would be difficult to give you an opinion on which method you should use. I hope this helps you out.

    • george 6 years ago

      yes it helps me out thank i have the same sink and cabinets as the above pic refridge, stove exactly the same kitchen same color. i was think on taking out the floor from the back all the way up under the shower its a 5 wheel its a 30 foot toy hauler by thor thank u u may of changed my mine i have the floor out from the back all the way up to the kitchen

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Glad to help, George. You may be able to remove the inside cabinet floor separately, but unless the floor is bad it's easier to replace up to the cabinet base. There is very little weight exerted on the floor under the cabinets. Good luck!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello, Jerry! As you can tell from the pics in my article, the Dutchman units do not have enough floor joists in the floor. These joists are not numerous enough to fully support the combination particleboard and Styrofoam sub-floor.

      The squeaking could possibly be caused by a joining point of the particleboard sections rubbing together. Adding a few screws could help but this also depends on the floor covering you would have to go through to add them.

      Sorry if this doesn't help, but without actually seeing what the cause of the weakness and squeaking floor is, it is impossible to tell.

      Thanks for reading my article and contact me again if you think I can help.

      Randy

    • kevin 6 years ago

      Love reading these articles.. I have recently bought a 2006 r-vision travel sport. I bought it knowing there was some floor damage. After receiving the unit i noticed the water damage had came from a leaky drain systen from the kitchen sink. The sink cabinet was busted up also. i have decided to go ahead and replace the floor from the front bedroom all the way back to the bunk beds. I cant tell of any damage under the cabinet but the one cabinet needs replacing. there are quiet a bit of soft spots going from kitchen to the back which is the bathroom. I would say about one half the unit. My plan is replacing everything with laminant flooring but i am scared that this will make the floor to high for the slide out to slide over, besides figuring out how to get the floor under the slide out. I noticed that the flooring seems like it goes all the way under the walls. I guess my question is should i use this type flooring, and should i plan on removing all the floor cabinets. Any advice?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Kevin! Yes, in most cases the floor is put down first, so the walls are atop whatever flooring was installed originally. As far as using laminant flooring is concerned, as long as it isn't thicker than the original flooring, it should be fine.

      Removing the floor cabinets will be quite a job, but it depends on how much trouble you want to take with your repairs. Unless the cabinets are unsteady because of the damaged floor, I would install the new floor up to, or slightly under the base of the cabinets.

      Good luck with your repair and feel free to ask about any encountered problems. Thanks for reading my articles!

    • Roger 6 years ago

      I have a 1981 class c motorhome with water damage to the floor. It has extended under the exterior walls,and the walls on each side appear to have settled bowing the center.How can I lift the sides to replace the sub floor that is underneath?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Unless the walls are in danger of coming loose from the floor, I would not try to lift the walls in order to replace the floor. Install a floor joist next to the walls in order to attach the new subfloor to the chassis. If the floor beneath the walls are rotten, it should be no problem to remove the deteriorated wood enough to slide new wood beneath the walls by levering them up slightly.

      It all depends on how the walls are attached to the floor and how much space remains when the old floor is removed.

      I hope this info helps you with your repairs. Feel free to ask if you need more info on this project. Thanks for viewing my article.

    • Wendell 6 years ago

      I have water damage right inside the door. Water somehow got in around the door. How can I fix a small area and match the lenolium.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Wendell. Determine a square or rectangular area which covers the entire damaged area. You want to ensure the remaining floor is sound on all sides of the proposed area to be removed. It is important to use a framing square to determine the proposed section to be removed so the new piece will fit well.

      Start by drilling a large hole in the damaged area to determine the thickness of the floor. This will tell you how deep your saw blade needs to go.

      Use a reciprocating saw (sawzall) or jig saw to cut out the premeasured damaged floor. Be careful that your saw blade doesn't go much past the flooring material itself to avoid damaging the bottom of your camping unit.

      Use whatever size wood is necessary to support the edges of the remaining floor and the new floor section. By centering a one and a half inch support board around the area you allow one half of the board to support the new section.

      Countersink holes around the perimeter and use deck screws to tie everything down. If you cannot match the linoleum, use a brick or stone textured piece to look like an entry section. An old carpenter's trick is, if you can't hide a mistake, make it obvious.

      Good luck and don't be afraid to try this yourself. I don't think you can do irreparable damage to this repair job. Thanks for reading my article!

    • Al Bell 6 years ago

      I think you have to remember that you are living in a house that is set squarely on an earthquake fault line. It is moving and twisting and turning all the time just as if it were in an earthquake. You have to take care of it and make repairs constantly. Especially in a motor home. If you don't water lines will leak and electric will short out... any number of things. We are full time RVers and it is a constant chore to caulk leaks and be mindful of the condition of our house. That is why your articles are so helpful and welcome. Most of us are up to doing minor repairs but something major is daunting. RV repair facilities are over charging RVers because they think we are all rich. Keep up the good work. Well written and easy to understand.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thank you so much, Al! I'm glad you find my RV hubs helpful. Yes, RVs need constant care, especially if you use them frequently. This is why it is so important to do the repairs yourself if possible. It is indeed a shame repairs cost so much at RV repair shops. Thanks for the nice comments!

      Randy

    • Maggie 6 years ago

      Help I have a travel trailer and on one side of the floor in our bedroom the floor is soft we cannot afford to take to be fixe due how can we fix this our self. thank you for your help

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      There's no other way than to dig in and tear the bad flooring out. You can't do irreparable damage and you will be no worse off by trying to fix it yourself.

      Use my article as a guide but be aware that there are many different types of floor supports in different travel trailers. Without seeing the damage I can give no better advice than this. Sorry Maggie, feel free to ask me for further info if you think I may be of assistance.

      Thanks for reading my article!

    • David 6 years ago

      Randy, Just purchased a used travel trailer. There is a small softspot right inside the entry door underneath the fire exstiguisher and against the outside wall. It appears harmless right now. I do not see any current leaks and have tried a water hose and cant seem to see any leaking now. What are the risks of not doing an immediate repair ?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      This could be from a previous leak, David. It's possible the leak has been repaired and the floor damage may not get any worse. I would apply some sealer to the seam above the door and around the door trim

      If the walls are hollow it is possible it many be seeping down inside the wall and soaking the floor. If it is still leaking this will deteriorate the floor even further, especially if the floor consists of particleboard.

      Thanks for reading!

    • Mike Reiter 6 years ago

      Randy,looking at an 85 ford (68000) mi.rv that had a roof leak.I noticed the ceiling to be a bit uneven and rotting wood in the walls.we are talking $1400.00.i am very goo at handy work.look for info to replace walls in side and ceiling but could not find --any suggestions on this purchase and repair.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Mike! I am not familiar with the type of walls in this model but if you are handy with tools I see no reason you can't repair them yourself. Solid walls may pose a problem as the exterior siding is attached to them. If they use studs it will be a simple matter to remove the paneling and repair the damage. The same goes for the ceiling. Good luck on the repairs!

      Feel free to ask about any problems if you think I can be of assistance.

      Thanks for reading!

    • Megan 6 years ago

      can you put a floating laminate floor in a camper??

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I have never installed a floating floor in a camper before, Mega! However, I have heard of it being done. I foresee no problems in the installation or materials but I cannot guarantee the results or longevity of the floor.

      If you decide to try a floating floor, I would be pleased if you would comment here on the results.

      Thanks for reading my article!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @Peter Vincent Sorry Peter, but the link on your comment raided warnings on my computer. I had no choice but to delete your comment.

      I have never heard about the technique you mentioned but it sounds possible if I understand it correctly.

      Thanks for reading!

    • Jason 6 years ago

      i have a cub aero im replacing the floor in there is no joist just the frame rails there is plywood then foam then plywood it just seems there just isn't enough support under it what would you recommend

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      A common problem, Jason. As in the floor repair photos in this article, you can see the lack of proper support in this floor. We added more floor joists to assure a firm foundation for the new plywood floor.

      You may have to use self tapping screws to attach more floor joists to the frame rails. The more the better! I hope I understood your problem and my suggestion works for you. If not, feel free to comment again and I will try to help. Thanks for reading!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Try using self tapping screws to attach new floor joists to the frame rails. Many RV's do not have enough floor joists or any at all. By attaching 2 inch thick boards to the frame you can then use wood screws to attach the floor joists at a proper distance for good floor support.

      Feel free to ask for further clarification if needed! Thanks for reading!

    • Jerry Sams 6 years ago

      I have an older Yellowstone camper with a tip out/ cut in and the floor has some damage to the tip out area, the previous owner did a hatchet job of repairing part of the area and left the other part undone. my question is how do I support the tip out while replacing the floor. by my measurements the area is 4'x7.5 and I think just 1/2 thick. I look forward to your reply as I plan on starting the repair asap

    • Jery Sams 6 years ago

      Sorry Randy, I forgot to mention that this camper is set up in a seasonal campsite and never moved, it also has a shingled roof covering it and an added sun room

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I'm not sure I understand what a tip out/cut in is, Jerry. If you mean a slide out room then it may be necessary to place supports around the perimeter of the room while repairing the floor. If you can clarify your problem of supporting the area I will try to give more precise advice. Thanks!

    • Jerry 6 years ago

      Well when we bought the camper we were told it was a tip out, but someone else told me that the camper wall was actually cut out and this section added to it, I see several like it around the campsite so whatever it's called it is common. Also I think it's called a park model. It looks like I may have to support the outer walls before removing the floor......

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Whether it was added or came that way, you will need to support the walls while repairing the floor. Utilizing wood beams and blocks should enable you to accomplish the job easily enough. Sorry I can't be of more assistance but I haven't encountered this type floor repair job before.

      If I can help you with any problems encountered while doing this repair please ask. I would be interested in how your repairs turn out and I'm sure others would too.

      Thanks again and also for reading and commenting on my article.

    • Jerry Sams 6 years ago

      Thanks Randy, I'm going to try to make the repairs soon and will let you know how it turned out, like you have said here before, I can afford to make a mistake or two as long as I do no extensive damage to the camper while trying to fix it..........

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      You are right, Jerry! Take your time and you will be pleased with the results. Please do let me know how it turns out, I'm sure others will appreciate your experience too! Good luck and thanks!

      Randy

    • mdubrey44 6 years ago

      Randy, i bought a used 2003 19 ft. travel trailer a couple years ago. last year i noticed a small soft spot in the center of the camper floor, probably the weakest spot in the camper. by reading the other posts, i'm assuming it is probably due to the lack of floor joists. there is no evidence of leaks from the roof or plumbing. i was considering installing a laminate floor to add a little stability rather than remove everything to add joists. what do you think? any other suggestions? thanks randy...you're the man!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      The laminate floor will surely help the stability but I'm not sure if it will last if the spot is very big. Some laminates will break if the spot is so big it allows them to flex very much.

      But on the other hand it would be simple to remove the laminate floor and do the repairs if it proved to be unstable. It's your call mdubrey!

      Thanks for checking out my hub!

    • Jay 6 years ago

      We recently bought a 1995 Shasta 5th wheel. Owner said the previous people's water heater tank leaked and caused the floor in the kitchen area damage. He said he tore up that area and replaced it. But didn't go under the cabinets, is that a problem? Also, the entry way door enters into the kitchen that is where the new floor was laid then to the right is the little carpeted section with the table and I don't feel any soft spots there but he never replaced the floor, is there still possibility the leak ruined under that as well and there isn't soft spots? Would it be best to rip up the carpet and check? Then the next area is the vanity sink to the left and bathroom to the right before going up into the bedroom area. We noticed in front of the vanity sink there is a small soft spot, so we are assuming that's from another leak correct?? How do we check over the camper to make sure there aren't any leaks? We just bought it and are very new to 5th wheels. We have no idea what to do!!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Jay! There is no way to check for damaged flooring that doesn't have obvious soft spots without removing the carpet. Sorry, but this is the way of things in most RV's.

      Usually, areas away from sinks, showers, and toilets are not exposed to water damage unless the whole area is flooded. The soft spots will eventually have to be repaired as the wood used usually deteriorates from being walked on.

      Not replacing the floor under the cabinet should pose no problem as it isn't walked on. Sorry I can't give more precise advise without seeing the camper first hand.

      If you think I can help further please feel free to ask.

    • Ivo 6 years ago

      Hello, just found lots of water damage on the floor of my triple bunk trailer. The damage is on the floor under the bunk and it seems to extend to the bathroom right next to it and possibly under a cabinet (pantry). My question is do I have to remove the cabinets and walls or just replace the floor up to them ? any suggestions are appreciated. Thanks

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      You can just replace the floor up to the cabinets and walls, Ivo! Just add supporting joists wherever they are needed, such as along the walls, cabinets, and at any flooring joints! Goog luck on your repairs and thanks for reading!

    • Ivo 6 years ago

      Thanks. Quick question: would you recommend I replace all wood that has been exposed to moisture ? Do you replace wood that is damp but solid still ? Thanks.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      If the wood is particleboard it is best to replace it as it will begin to disintegrate eventually. Plywood which is still solid may be retained. Thanks, Ivo!

    • Autoaficianado profile image

      Autoaficianado 6 years ago from California

      Great advice in this article! The finished floor looks flawless. A good word of advice for anyone interested in purchasing an RV is to not buy an off-brand (a brand that no-ones heard of), unless you're sure their product is good. Many times in the past I've had friends who have bought weird brand-name RVs. They loved their new RV, until unforseen problems arose in the transmission, plumbing, etc... So be careful and do your homework!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks for the comments, Auto! Your advice about buying off-brand RV's is worth taking in consideration by would-be owners. The plumbing problems can be dealt with but engine and transmission parts may be difficult to locate for some motorhomes.

    • Jack S 6 years ago

      I too have purchased a used rv with water damage to to the bathroom floor. I plan to replace the wet wood with new and have already taken the toilet out. However, I went to take the sink vanity out and it looks as if the cabinet is attatched from the outside of the trailer. any ideas how to remove the sink without tearing up the walls. Any advice is appreciated.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      This not uncommon,Jack! Many RV's have the cabinets, both bath and kitchen, built in place. The best you can do is either tear them out and build new ones, or try to remove and replace the floor underneath.

      The simplest thing to do is just replace the floor up to the cabinet and not worry about putting new floor beneath. This is the method used in this article. Since you will not be walking on the floor beneath the vanity it really doesn't matter. Thanks, I hope you have good luck with your floor repair!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Brent, I cannot allow your comment because of the link attached. Sorry, but I will still answer your question, which is:

      "I have a 1974 scamper trailer 14 foot single axle with water damage under the rear bed which i discovered while removing the water storage tank which had a slight leak. Is this section of floor difficult to replace? Should I replace the whole floor? Thanks for your advice!"

      You do not have to replace the entire floor, Brent. Simply cut out the bad section, place new joists of some sort around the cut-out, centering them beneath the old and new floor edges. This gives both edges support. Use wood screws to attach the flooring to the joist.

    • Bonnie 6 years ago

      Randy,

      Good article and good answers to the many questions asked of you.

      We have a 2003 Jayco Eagle 24 ft. fifth wheel. We have torn out the tile in the kitchen area (in the rear) and the carpet in the non-slider portion of the dining/living area. We have decided to leave the carpet on the slider portion for now until we see how we do with the rest. We want to tile, probably with tile squares as opposed to sheet, as it will be easier. Which is better - cement down or peel and stick? Will a water spill seep through the joints? Lastly, what is the best way to attach the edge that is under the slider? Thank you in advance for your answer.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Bonnie and thanks for visiting my article page! A good quality peel-and-stick tile will do very well if you first treat the floor with a glue activation coating. When this coating dries it activates the glue on the tile and creates a permanent bond between the tile and floor. Find this at Lowe's or Home Depot!

      If you mistakenly touch the tile to the floor before it is in the right position, you will understand how good this bond is when attempting to remove the misplaced tile. You will have to scrape it up in pieces to remove it!

      Although minor instances of water being spilled will not affect the tiles, long exposure to dampness or standing water will damage almost any floor covering. The peel-and-stick tile installs easily and is very flexible and durable for ordinary RV flooring.

      A thin carpet bar or stripping may work for the edge under the slider. Without seeing the area, it is hard for me to give you proper advice. I hope this helps you in your reflooring project!

    • Eric Trisler 6 years ago

      I have just bought a 05 travel lite 30 ft. with a slide. After purchasing the trailer we found out that the previous owners did not drain the hot water tank and it froze and busted leaking water all over the floor. We found the floor was wet when we got it home and then started noticing soft spots in the hallway and bathroom. I am thinking about just going underneath and bracing it up with marine grade plywood and acq 2x4s and putting basically a small section of floor joist system like a house and fastening it to the frame underneath the existing floor. The reason for this is the flooring is all one piece throughout and is undamaged on top. is this possible or should I repair it from the inside.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Eric, and thanks for visiting my article page. I am not too fond of this idea because it seems to me if the floor has soft spots this would indicate some damage to the floor itself. I can only assume you are referring to the floor covering itself and not the sub floor.

      However, since I cannot examine the trailer I will not try and dissuade you from doing what you think is easiest and most economical in your view. Perhaps a little more info would help out! Is the bottom of the RV uncovered? Is it easy to get to the area beneath the sub floor itself?

    • Bonnie 6 years ago

      Randy, Thanks so much for the answer. I do have one more question. Is there a good way to tell "good quality tile squares" from those that are not so good? I know price is not necessarily the best way to tell. Thanks again.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      You are welcome, Bonnie! You can check the stated warranty or ask a salesperson at Lowe's or Home depot about the quality of the tiles. Be sure to get boxes with the same lot numbers to insure the colors match. There are often subtle differences in color and pattern in different lots. Thanks again!

    • Debbie 6 years ago

      Hi Randy,

      Kudos to you for this site! I am selling an older 60's model Airstream and as far as I can tell, the floor is quite solid. I have a long-distance interest asking me to variously jab the floor with an ice pick to see how far into the wood it will go. Is this a good way to test for soft spots in the floor? Can you tell me any other ways to detect soft flooring? Walking, bouncing and listening do not reveal anything to me.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Using an ice pick may indicate a soft spot in the floor, Debbie! But unless you use it all over the whole floor just trying to find a soft spot with this method will damage it.

      If walking and bouncing does not reveal any soft spots, the odds are there are none to be found. Unless there have been roof leaks or plumbing problems, there is no reason to suspect a damaged floor.

      Thanks for reading and feel free to ask further questions if you think I can be of assistance!

    • Eric Trisler 6 years ago

      Hello Randy, In regards to the floor in our rv. Yes it is completely covered underneath.

      And thinking about it, putting something underneath would be of no value because there is no way to get it up against the subfloor due to joist already being there. so I will follow your instructions and have my wife go pick out some alternate flooring. Is it possible to put a free floating floor in one of these? I have plenty of clearance from the bottom of the cabinet doors and such to make up for the extra thickness.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I thought this might be the case, Eric! As regards to free floating flooring, the sub floor must be sound as a floating floor is not strong enough to support much weight in itself.

      The floating floor will work well as I have heard of some using it. Good luck and please stop back by if you think I may assist you in any way.

      Thanks,

      Randy

    • Bonnie 6 years ago

      Hello Randy,

      We are still working on replacing our RV floor (2003 Jayco Eagle fifth-wheel). We have taken up the carpet and linoleum on the non-slider portion of the floor, with the exception of the bathroom, under the cabinets in the kitchen and the small square area in front of the door. My question is: Is it better to leave this piece of linoleum, that has no seams, in front of the door that might have sustained dampness due to tracking in, or is it better to replace that along with the rest with tile squares?

      We thought that it being one piece it might be better to leave it as a wetness protection, but we wonder if the joining strip will cause a hazard that we might trip over. We do keep a throw rug over the area to help collect dirt and sand. We would appreciate your expertise in this matter.

      Thanks again for your help.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      This has to be your call, Bonnie! But a well installed tile floor should give you adequate protection from dampness re the tracking in moisture. But if you decide to leave the original floor there are thinner joint strips you can utilize to prevent the tripping hazard you are concerned about!

      Congrats on your progress!

      Randy

    • B Adams 6 years ago

      Hello Randy, I have a 1995 Kustom Koach travel trailer that has two sections of floor rot. These are both on the right side of the trailer, one in the front corner extending back five feet or so and the other at the back corner, probably three feet long. Both of these sections seem to extend under the outside wall. Can I fix these from inside the unit or do I have to remove the outside skin in order to replace the rotted wood under the wall?

    • Gaby Swank 6 years ago

      Hi, Randy. Love this site. Your advice has been excellent. Your dedication to it is awesome. Anyway, I have a 2003 Rexhall Rexair A class. We just purchased it. We would like to replace the carpet in it and change it to laminate. It has two slides. Can you laminate the whole thing, or do you have to have carpet where the slide is? I worry that it would scratch the laminate every time you open or close the slide.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi B Adams! You do not have to remove the outside skin but will have to attach some wood to the frame from the inside for the edge of the new flooring to rest on. You will have a better idea of how you can do this after the damaged flooring is removed.

      It may be necessary to use self tapping screws to attach the supporting joists to the steel frame. Thanks for visiting and feel free ask for more info!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Gaby! Thanks for the nice comments! You have asked me a question that I do not know the answer to! I have never been faced with such an option so I'm afraid to advise you on this matter. But perhaps there is a pad which may be placed beneath the slide which would prevent such abrasions! Sorry, but I will try to find out about this soon!

    • Ellyn Tallon 6 years ago

      Hello Randy, Love this site! & glad to hear Im not alone with h2o damaged floors! :) I have a 2000' Palamino ultralite. Bought it with a soft floor 2 yrs ago...now it's really bad! & Im fealing really impowered to tackle this major repair now after doing some research & reading your site. Im not sure how to locate where there may have been water leaking though. Should I tear up the floor 1st then hook up the city water and turn it on and look for leaks that way? and how can you tell if theres a leaky water heater as it's enclosed in styrofoam? It's wet and damaged through out the entire walking area right into the bathroom, but not within 4-6 inches of all the surrounding cabinets. I think I lucked out there huh? :) This is a very poorly designed camper as the body is fiberglass and the beds are like those of a pop up on either end of the camper. Terrible for water leakage, the rain gutter above the bunk out does not defer the rain away from the camper, but allows it find ways of running in the camper! Forever caulking! :( hahaha

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Ellyn! Sorry to take so long to answer but I have been camping in a spot with no internet access. Yes, it sounds as if you do have a few problems. Removing the damaged area and then checking the plumbing is an excellent idea. You should be able to find any leaking pipes or fixtures this way.

      The water heater should also show some leakage under pressure over a period of time either on or beneath the floor if it is damaged. Yes, you are lucky if the floor is good enough to keep from going under the cabinets!

      These floor jobs all seem to be a bit different but there is little damage you can do which cannot be repaired, so don't be afraid to tackle the job! Good luck and thanks for visiting my hubs!

    • Christine 6 years ago

      We purchased a 2000 Coachmen 29' TT, upon getting it home from the dealer found that the floor in the bathroom was very soft (the water heater had 2 cracks it and we have replaced it with a new one). So we decided to rip the floor out. The previous owner had put a lenolium on top of the original floor in the kitchen and bath. We took out the carpet in the living room as well as the lenolium and plan on replacing it with the self adhesive time on a diagonal in all 3 areas (I realize this will be more work but in my opinion I think it will look better).

      My questions are:

      The plywood that was replaced has space between it and the old floor, what is the best way to fill that to eliminate the gaps so that the tiles won't break on us??

      We are in NH so the weather is getting cold, will leaving the heat on in the camper be enough to warm the floor so that the tiles will adhere?

      Do I need to do something to the plywood so that the tiles will stick properly??

      Thank you in advance!!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks for stopping by, Christine! The gaps between the old and new flooring may be filled with ordinary wood filler if they aren't to big. There are products made for just such applications sold at most Home Depot or Lowe's building supply stores.

      While you are there, ask in the flooring department for a glue activation solution for adhesive backed vinyl tile. Most of these products are rolled on the floor and allowed to dry before setting the tile.

      Be very sure the tile is in the exact position before pressing it down. If you get one crooked it is very hard to remove and usually have to tear it up in pieces.

      It may be better to warm the floor and tiles before application. Good luck on your floor job and enjoy your camping trips!

      Randy

    • Mandee 6 years ago

      Hi Randy, I have really enjoyed reading your posting about replacing the flooring. We recently purchased a 2007 Tahoe by Thor Toy hauler. After we got it home, we found a soft spot (18" X 24"). We can conclude, due to a "hint" that the seller dropped, That the water damage occurred when he allowed the fresh water tank to overflow. We have repaired the inlet but we are still concerned about the softness in the floor. Is it mandatory that we fix it? Are we going to cause more damage if we let it go? Is there any way that the floor could fall through? Thank you.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello, Mandy! The soft spot will eventually get worse as you walk over the area, but it might be okay for a while depending on how often you use your RV.

      If the leak is stopped now no addition damage should be caused by not repairing the soft spot. You will have to be the judge of when this spot gets too bad to ignore.

      Thanks for reading and I hope this advice is of use to you!

      Randy Godwin

    • Sway 6 years ago

      Hi! I've purchased a 1984 Heritage 5000. This is my first experience with owning a Motorhome and I am planning to do most of the repairs myself. I'm having trouble locating information on repairing body damage and also where materials that are suitable can be located. I would like to tear the outer shell loose and re-fit another in its place. Is this do-able or am I off my rocker? I believe I'm up to the work and feel certain my carpentry skills will allow this to happen if I could locate the proper materials. Thanks for any help

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I am not familiar with the materials used on this particular motorhome, Sway! Many motorhomes use a solid wall material instead of a stud wall with removable metal on the exterior.

      If yours is the type which uses an aluminum siding type material, it may be possible to replace it. You will have to be the judge of whether you are up for the project or not! Sorry I could not be of better service.

      Randy

    • Sway 6 years ago

      Thanks for the response Randy,

      It appears to be a form of sealed particle board over a 1x1 frame....without tearing off completely I believe I have a front and back aluminum skeleton for the front and back structure with wooden framing between. That issue is easily solved. I'm wondering about suppliers for any siding that I may use in place of what I tear off. All I have come up with on google searches is rv business's. The interior and outside I intend on highly customizing and treating the vehicle as a mechanically sound platform. I guess my main question was whether or not you knew of lighter weight materials that are commonly used and where they might be found. Thanks again, I'm sorting this thing out as I go and its a learning process. Sorry my question wasn't as clear the first go around. I'm up for adaption. Just trying to keep the overall weight down. Hope your having a great Thanksgiving!

    • Sway 6 years ago

      s'cuse me, I meant 2x2

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @Sway-Perhaps fiberglass or aluminum sheeting might work well for the exterior material. I Googled "fiberglass sheets" and found this site :

      http://www.fiberglasssheets.com/

      There are more search options but this is the first one I tried. Others may suit you even better. Fiberglass is easily customized and paints well. It also has good longevity and is easily repaired.

      I hope this info helps you with your project! Let me know how it turns out as I am writing an article about exterior repairs on RVs.

      Thanks for stopping in!

      Randy

    • Sway 6 years ago

      Will certainly keep you updated. Thanks for the link too!

      I figured it was a wrong question problem and not a lack of anwere's issue.

      We will see how it goes on the repair, need to talk with the insurance company Monday. Hit a large deer on the way home and I don't know where my renovation project is at, at the moment. The front nose collapsed and the whole structure took a bad shock. Hoping its not totaled in the adjusters eyes.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Yep, the deer here cause lots of damage to vehicles too! Sorry to hear about the damage, argue like the dickens with the adjuster and tell him you want it fixed instead of totaled! In some states they have to fix it if you want them to!

      Please stop in again!

      Randy

    • Jaime 6 years ago

      Randy, I have a soft spot in the plywood in the hallway/galley area of my Winnebago Minnie. I have read what you wrote about just cutting out the soft spot and patching the hole, but I am concerned that this will "hold". It seems like a weak fix to me. Am I being paranoid? My second thought is with regard to the VERY cold floors now that I have it (mostly) stripped down to the plywood. (I am also replacing the particle board kitchen cabinetry that has disintegrated, so that isn't an issue, but will have to work underneath all of the electrical and plumbing tubes that is run through there.) There is a web site called warmyourfloor.com that sells a) Cork Insulation for concrete Slab (R-Value = 3.1 per inch) Sold by the Sq Ft. And I am thinking of using this to insulate the plywood floor. Your thoughts? And b) the 12" (or maybe 24") wide 120 volt SunTouch under floor heat mat sold on the same web site. Just run a strip straight down the hallway from the bedroom to the front cab, This wouldn't heat the entire floor, but a goodly portion of it. To top it all off, I am thinking either globus or APC cork tiles, but I am not positive if cork flooring would moot the point of the heat mat underneath it by completely insulating the mat. Your thoughts?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      The patch will hold fine if you make sure the edges of the patch are screwed down to the new floor joists added during the repairs. Add as many extra floor supports as you think necessary.

      Not sure about using the cork floor and the heat mat but feel they may work well together. Even though the cork is an insulator, it should still warm up to a certain extent.

      Let me know how it works out, Jaime. It sounds interesting. Thanks for reading my article and for the questions.

      Randy Godwin

    • Jaime 6 years ago

      Ok. Questions! When I crawl underneath my coach, I cannot see any plywood at all. It seems to have a steel(?) pan floor. Seems to me this could be bad, because that could hold any water that seeped through the wood to make it soft in the first place, right? The "plywood" is actually 1-1/4" thick. Is this most likely two layers of 3/4" plywood? Or one super heavy duty chunk of wood? (nah - surely not...?) If it is two layers, it is so squished together, I can't tell. Oddly enough, the exterior walls do not sit on top of the floor, which is what I thought from reading that I would find. I'm feeling very intimidated by this project, and progressing ever so slowly. Also! What is going to be the best product to seal new wood with before I install insulation or flooring? Do I want an oil based or water based sealant? Will any "Thompson's" type deck sealant do? I want to protect from further possible plumbing accidents. Thanks, Randy! I appreciate your time.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello again Jaime. In the photos on this hub you can see the metal covering beneath the floor joists. It is a galvanized steel material. Styrofoam filled the gaps between the few floor joists with the final flooring being 1" particleboard.

      Your particular RV may not be exactly like this as there are many different variations. I replaced the particleboard with pressure treated plywood to guard against future damage. No preservative is needed in this case. If you use standard plywood make sure any sealant will accept adhesives if you plan to use a stick-on type flooring.

      Two layers of 3/4 " plywood will work fine. You might have to add more floor joists along the walls for the edge of the flooring to rest on if there aren't enough already. It never hurts to have more.

      Yes, the steel covering caused the water damage on the floor featured in this article. It couldn't escape and eventually rotted the wood. I drilled a few drain holes to prevent this from happening again.

      Don't be discouraged with the floor repair, you can get it done. Feel free to ask me about any problems you encounter and I'll help you all I can.

      Randy

    • Deb 5 years ago

      Hi and thanks for such an informative blog.

      We just purchased a 1999 prowler 5th wheel 305x model.

      I want to replace the carpet t/o and put in new lino flooring. The super slide is my concern. How do I get old carpet out from underneath the slide and keep slide from tearing the lino once replaced? I want the carpet out of the supper slide area also.SO the edge must be covered with..... Any suggestion?

      Thanks somuch for your help and advice.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I am not familiar with your particular model, Deb. I will try to see if I can find something similar so I can advise you on your dilemma. Check back later and comment again in case I forget. I've got "Old timer's" disease and forget sometimes.

      Thanks

      Randy

      Randy

    • Del 5 years ago

      I want to replace the carpet in my travel trailer (Airstream-Bambi) with some other type of flooring. Any suggestions? I have two dogs that will travel with me. My wife would prefer some type of laminate or wood flooring. Would you suggest some waterproofing prior to setting the floor?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks for the question, Del! The Airstream Bambi is a great travel trailer. I've been looking for one to remodel and do a step-by-step pictorial article in the process.

      Laminate flooring has been used on some RV reflooring projects with the owners having satisfactory results, as far as I know. Peel and Stick vinyl tile works very well if you use a glue activator on the sub-floor before installation.

      Yes, I would recommend using some sort of waterproofing agent or at least some roofing felt if you are planning to use a "floating" laminate floor.

      Good luck on your RV floor repair to your Airstream and I hope this advice is satisfactory for your purpose.

      Thanks for reading my article!

      Randy

    • Tara 5 years ago

      My friend gave me her 95 dutchmen rv 5th wheel last year and me and my family have been living in it for 9 months now just today i noticed a squeak in the floor and u can see a line that goes across the floor like it is a weak spot...i know the bathroom has a leak so i dont use the shower at all anymore...is it possible for the bunk part upstairs to break off the camper?really has me scared i have little children and i have no insurance on this thing...or can we fall through the floor?any advice would be very helpful..thank you

    • Tara 5 years ago

      and the line im talking about is in the living room by the fridge

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Tara,

      While I cannot guarantee you the bunks part won't fall off, I would think the odds are very slim. More than likely, it would be a very slow collapse if indeed it broke.

      The same for the floor unless it is very soft, and even them you wouldn't go all the way through the floor as it is probably layered in styrofoam panels. The line is possibly a joint where the particleboard or plywood flooring panels join together. In other words, a joint seam.

      I hope this helps allay your fears somewhat, but please be careful and watch the floor for further signs of any weakness.

      Thanks for reading my article!

      Randy

    • Mike 5 years ago

      Great article!

      I have a 2006 Dutchmen that purchased last year. As everyone else, the floor started flexing. I stripped the linoleum this winter and found a large part of the floor was wet and rotting. Mine has the synthetic membrane on the bottom, thin layer of wood, 1 ½” Styrofoam, then the thin top layer of wood. It is unbelievable how these floors hold up at all. I believe the water got in the floor from an open roof vent and went into a wire whole under the dinette bench from a previous owner.

      So far I have tried to repair it the way they had it and the results were only flexing. Then I took it to a welder and had him weld supports 1 ft apart underneath the trailer… still flexed. So I ripped everything out, used a heat cutter to cut grooves in the Styrofoam for wooden supports where they had none. Then I glued and screwed the same thickness plywood they had on top of the supports… Still flexed. So then I bought more plywood ¼” thick and liquid nailed it to what I had down. Now the flexing has stopped.

      I wrote a long e-mail to Dutchmen about the poor floor design (They did tell me FEMA was the original purchaser). I suggest we all should let the manufacture’s know that these poor floor designs are not acceptable to us consumers. Once water gets into these floors it has nowhere to go or no way to dry up.

      Again Randy, great article. I wish I would have found it a month or two sooner. lol

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @Mike--Thanks so much for relating your repair procedures and the problems you encountered while attempting repairs.

      We used 3/4 inch thick pressure treated plywood and added extra floor joists to ensure the floor would not flex when walked upon.

      I agree with your opinion concerning how shoddily these camping trailers are constructed. Someone's palm was well greased to overlook the potential problems these type floors represent. Many FEMA contractors got rich by skimping on materials during the Katrina fiasco.

      Thousands of these units were built and then were prohibited from being used as planned because they weren't certified for use in low areas. Now we understand why. Of course, nothing was done to those profiting from the vast sum spent to build them. LOL!

      So good luck getting anyone to listen to your complaints about these trailers.

      Thanks again for your input Mike, and for reading my article.

      Randy

    • Ray 5 years ago

      Hello

      I just purchased a 1995 Prowler with a front slide. We would like to have the carpet replaced because the rest of the camper is in excellent condition. I am not sure how you would go about getting the carpet under the slide. The slide comes in level and goes out level with no tilt. I can not even get one finger under it. The previous owner had done it and did a great job. I just don't want to be tilting slides out if there is another way. Also there is some flex in the front floor. Does not feel soft or rotted just a little bounce in it is this normal.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Ray,

      I cannot give you any advice on this particular slide-out at his time as I am unfamiliar with how it is attached. I will try to find out more for you but you may have to contact the company or one with a similar type slide-out for the easiest procedure.

    • Heather 5 years ago

      I wanted to thank you for all your articles and to ask you a quick question. We recently have a 87 Prowler that we purchased - it is staying stationary at a camp. We are redoing the inside and found one spot in the floor that we think we will have to take all the way down. How hard is it to go to the base and redo the floor from the skin up? Not sure if the "skin" is aluminum or what, we haven't gotten that far yet. I hope this something we can do in a weekend - lol.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Heather, and thanks for reading my RV articles. To be honest with you, I am not familiar with your particular RV's floor construction. There are so many different models of RVs not to mention, different construction methods used, I cannot advise you with any degree of confidence.

      I usually discover the method used for an RV floor installation when I remove the bad spot or area of the floor, especially in the older models.

      I wish I could tell you how long it would take and how to do the repairs but without knowing the length of the RV, or the floor construction method used, I simply cannot help you very much.

      If you can give me a little more info on the model and length, I may be able to find a similar RV to examine.

      Thanks again for reading and sorry I couldn't help you more at this time.

      Randy Godwin

    • Heather 5 years ago

      It is a late 80's Fleetwood Prowler Lynx. I am really worried about starting this project because I believe from the damage we saw we are going to have to do most of the floor. Should we take the outer skin off and jack the roof up to do the corners with the floor and the wall or will we be able to brace it from the inside? I cannot wait till this is done and we can actually get to enjoy camp! : - )

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Heather, you can replace the floor without jacking up the roof if you make sure to use good attaching points along the walls. It is a fairly time consuming job but not a complicated one. Good luck and enjoy your RV when you are done.

      Thanks

      Randy

    • Scott 5 years ago

      Hi Randy,

      Thanks for taking your time to make this info available to everyone.

      I have a Prowler Lynx with a rotten floor near the entrance.

      I took up the linoleum and removed Plywood - Foam - Plywood in a 3 X 4 ft area.

      My plan is:

      Add 2 X 4 joists underneath by drilling holes in the steel crossbeams and lagging in the 2 X's every 8 inches.

      Then attach 2X4's lying flat on the inside of the trailer by screwing them down, through the plastic bottom into the newly added joists.

      These 2X4's laying flat would replace the 1 1/2" foam and give me something to screw the new plywood floor onto.

      I've never down anything like this.

      What do you think about my plan?

      Thanks,

      Scott

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      It sounds like a strong repair, Scott. You just have to wing it sometimes as the thickness of the floor differs from model to model.

      Every RV floor repair I've done so far is far stronger than the original. Thanks for reading and let me know how the repair went.

      Randy

    • Dena 5 years ago

      I have a 2002 tahoe 5th whl camper it has hard wood in the kitchen area it got wet and turn black do you think we can leave the hardwood and take the carpet out and replace it all with vinyl and also can this be done without the slide hurting the vinyl.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I foresee no problems with your plans, Dena. The slide should not harm the new floor. Thanks for the question and for reading.

      Randy Godwin

    • Carol 5 years ago

      Randy, we live in northern California and have started a used trailer sales business. Where could we find classes or training for certification on repairing trailers (including the outside body)?

    • Al Newhall 5 years ago

      Have you tried the MINWAX wood hardening liquid and 2-part filler? I was able to solidify the edges of a soft spot in my RV floor, and then put a patch in the middle fairly easily using this stuff.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Al! I've used this product for the exterior of wood homes, but never for RV floor repair. Thanks for the tip and for stopping by.

      Randy Godwin

    • Nathan Lawalin 5 years ago

      I have a 1988 king of the road, fifth wheel with a slide out. how do I replace the carpet under the edge of the slide out? thanks

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Nathan, there are so many different types of slide-outs used in today's RVs it's difficult to give you precise instructions for replacing the carpet under them.

      Many slide-outs are installed after the carpet is already in place when the RV is assembled. I will see if I can find out more info for your particular model, though.

      Sorry I cannot help you more at this time. Thanks for the question and your time.

      Randy

    • Brenda 5 years ago

      I have a 1995 Jayco Eagle 35' fifth wheel camp trailer and I need to know how to remove and replace the ceiling in it. There is some water damage and we need to fix it but need some insight on how to do it

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Brenda, I'm not familiar with the type of ceiling in your particular model RV so I can't give you specific instructions for the repairs. There are too many different types of ceiling materials and different methods in which they are installed.

      Until you remove a portion of the ceiling you may not see exactly what the ceiling material is attached to. Sorry I cannot help you but feel free to ask further questions when you remove the old materials.

      Thanks for your time.

      Randy Godwin

    • Paul MCFadden 5 years ago

      I have a 2005 Kodiak. I belive it is made by Dutchman. The floor by the door is getting soft and I wanted to replace it. The door was leaking. I was told by a local trailer repair shop and also Dutchamd that the entire floor needs to be replaced. I will deal with a letter to them later, but for now has anyone ever repaired this newer type of floor? If so how? I can't believe they built something that can't be repaired!!!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Paul! The floor in these pictures is from a Dutchman RV. The soft spot was in the same area as yours, along the bottom of the door.

      The reason Dutchman and repair guys tell you the entire floor needs replacing is they want to do it themselves. As long as you use some sort of brackets to attach the new floor section to the walls you will be fine. Hope this helps you solve the problem.

      Randy

    • rudyaaaa 5 years ago

      Hi Randy,

      I just found your site and I received good info from you to replace the floor in my 5th wheel.

      You are so right about the lack of floor joists. I have a section of floor removed. There is some sort of fabric sheet, (black,) on top of the joists. Then a thin layer of insulation and finally 1/2" plywood. I think I'm working with about a 1 1/2" depth. I'm seriously thinking about using 1/2" cedar boards intended for fencing. If I can go over the one floor joist and find another under the booth or couch, I would criss cross and have 3 layers of cedar boards, deep. By using cedar and criss crossing, the floor should be strong and resistent to any dampness.

      Anything I should consider? Moisture barrier? If so, what do you suggest? Any and all tips you could give me is greatly appreciated.

      Thank you.

      rudy

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @Rudy--it wouldn't hurt to replace the moisture barrier and would be fairly cheap to do so. If you can add more floor joists it will help to support the floor better and give you more to screw the boards to.

      Any other assistance you may need you may feel free to ask here on the comments. Thanks for reading and for your question.

      Randy

    • tom carney 5 years ago

      Our 2001 26' Rockford needs a floor. We noticed softness initially but the dealer and later the servicemen repetitively said, "Oh no we checked..the floor is fine!" Anyone know why they don't use marine ply instead of flake board for floors? Apparently floors inevitably get wet and this is usually either the end of the RV's life or a huge expense to fix.

    • roneb 5 years ago

      Randy - I have a '98 Aerolite with water damage to the floor that has increased over the last year, but I have seen no obvious leaks inside. After reading your article I will probably try to replace this but am concerned it will just come back. Any suggestions on additional areas to inspect? Also, the sheet metal on the underneath side of the campeer has a few rusted spots and cracks - does it need to be replaced too? Thanks!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @Tom Carney-They don't use marine plywood because it costs more, Tom! it's all about building the RV as cheap as possible while making the most profit from the finished product. There should be better laws in place to ensure RV's are built well, but unfortunately there aren't.

      Never trust a dealer's opinion on suspected structural damage! Thanks for stopping by!

      Randy Godwin

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Roneb, even after a leak has been repaired, some moisture may remain in the area beneath the floor if it has steel or aluminum covering the underside of the RV.

      As in the featured floor repair in this article, the leak had been repaired but enough moisture was trapped beneath the floor to deteriorate the flooring material.

      This moisture will also cause the rusted and cracked areas on the underside of the camper you mentioned.

      you can better tell if these places need to be replaced if and when you repair the floor damage.

      Randy

    • mike 5 years ago

      Hi. I got a 95 shasta 245 for a gift from my neighbor, Great shape except the floor. The rear is the kitchen and the whole floor is weak (rotted) under the fridge and cabinets. I am a carpenter but never worked on campers. I noticed the rear outside is settling down over the frame rails to the point where the aluminum siding is bending. Should I remove the plastic sheathing from under the camper and attack it from the bottom or remove all the kitchen? Maybe both? Will it hurt anything to remove the plastic under the camper? What is that for anyways? It seems that it would trap any moisture that gets in ? Thanks for your input. Mike

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Mike! This is a tough call since I have no idea what type of floor you have in your Shasta. Obviously, the floor is supporting the weight of the exterior walls if the siding is under stress from the deteriorated floor.

      It may be necessary to remove the kitchen cabinets and other impediments from the area to access the support--whatever it may consist of--for the walls. It shouldn't be too difficult since you are are an experienced carpenter. Just take it slow as RV cabinets are not know for their sturdiness.

      Although the plastic beneath your RV is meant to keep moisture out--especially while moving it during wet weather--it can also trap water from a leaky roof or plumbing.

      Let me know if you find out how the floor is constructed and need more info. Thanks for your question and for reading.

      Randy Godwin

    • Robert 5 years ago

      I have a 2006 Fleetwood Mallard with a 13' slideout in the living/kitchen area. Due to a bad wiper seal and blowing rain on a trip I have some soft spots in the floor that extend up under the overlapping slide out floor. I need to get this repaired. Can the interior slide out trim boards with the bubble seal attaced be removed to allow the slide out to go out far enough to access the damaged floor? Or is it not that simple???

      Your site is great and very helpful.

      Thanks,

      Robert

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Robert! Different makers of RV's use different methods of constructing the slide outs. Most can be moved or detached by removing the trim s you suggest. You may be able to find the method of attachment by contacting the dealer or maker of your RV.

      Please let me know what you find out as it may help others with the same model. Thanks for visiting and the question. Sorry I cannot be more precise as there are many different makes of RV's these days.

      Randy

    • chris 4 years ago

      hi randy i have a 03 trail lite 8305s.the floor in front of whole slideout area is soft and sags when walked on.is it common for slide outs to leak or as it seems this camper is cheaply put together.could it be the subfloor material has just weakend from alot of traffic?i am a contractor and also considerd aproaching this problem from undernieth.but it sounds like that may be a bad idea.thanks for any suggestions. chris.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Welcome, Chris! Unfortunately yes, all RVs will tend to get leaks after about a decade especially if they have a rubber roof and spend lots of time exposed to the sun and elements.

      The slide-out sections are especially prone to leaks because of the extra risk of having a seal which allows movement while preventing rain from entering at the same time. The flat surface of the slide-out is conducive to water not draining away properly and increasing the chance for it to seep in around the seal.

      Yes, repairing the floor is not a huge job especially for a contractor. You might consider detaching the slide-out section while doing the repairs as I've had readers use this technique. Trying to do this beneath the RV is not recommended.

      Thanks for the question and ask for more info if needed!

      Randy

    • Jim stacey 4 years ago

      I have a 1999 Starcraft Starlite which has a very soft floor. The trailer has the fridge on one side and the micro, stovetop, and sink on the other. There is also the fresh water and hot water heater on the soft floor. Can you tell me if I have to take all those out or is there a way to support them while I take the floor out and replace it. The dinette is u shaped around the front and has to be taken out as well. The fresh water tank and the hot water heater are under one side of the dinette. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Jim Stacey St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Jim,

      This is a tough one for me to call since I cannot see your set-up, but if you are going to redo the entire floor it is perhaps better to remove these items out of your way if possible.

      I know it is quite a job, but you'd likely be surprised at how much easier it is to do than trying to work around them.

      You might however, work the area where these items are in small sections, replacing the floor on either side of them and then using this new solid floor as a base to lift the items up enough to replace the sections beneath.

      A last resort but workable in some instances. I hope this helps!

      Randy

    • ottoman 67 4 years ago

      randy, iam purchasing a 2007 xltravelstar by starcraft.when inspecting trailer i noticed that in the master bedroom that the roof vent had been knocked out by hail.although i did not see any damage. i did notice the linoleum was curled up under the bed in the storage compartment.the owner did not even realize that the vent was completely out and had not been to his camper in 6 mos. or so....how long does the board need to be exposed to water to rot?the camper did not smell musty inside. since the curled lin. is under master bed i am concerned about the weight. the floor right under the leak looks ok though

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Ottoman 67! It's hard to say how long the materials can stand being wet without knowing those used in your RV. You might try drilling some holes in the floor under the bed, or even using a hole saw to inspect the damage done by the leak, Otto!

      It may have only caused the glue holding the vinyl floor covering to have dissolved without doing much damage to the floor materials used. I doubt a large amount of water would have entered into the standard 14"X14" vent unless it was damaged for a very long time.

      But if you need anymore info on repairs feel free to ask. Thanks for your question and for reading.

      Randy

    • James 4 years ago

      Are the interior walls of a 2001 wilderness load bearing?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello James, I'm not sure about the load bearing status of your particular RV. Sorry, but you should be able to find out through the factory. There just too many models to give you a surefire answer on this one.

      Randy

    • steveenglish 4 years ago

      Randy, Im remodeling the rotten floor on my 1996 2000 milenium prism camper. What do I screw the floor joices to when I start back after removing all rotten floors?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Steve. I'm not familiar with your model RV, but you may have to install some 2x4's or other type beams along the sides of the floor to have something to attach the joists to. We added some in the RV featured in this article. You may have to use some long self tapping screws if you are going into the metal.

      Ask for more info if you need it or have another question.

      Randy

    • steveenglish 4 years ago

      How is the best way to get under the sink and refrigerator? If is soft under them the frig and the cabinet goes all the way to the ceiling. should I take it out or just cut around it and under it? Wasn't sure about all the wiring for the breaker box. My camper is 1996 made by Thor.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      This is the hard part, Steve. You can take these cabinets apart and redo the floor or simply try and slide some new plywood underneath them. In the featured RV the floor was soft but not enough to replace it so we simply worked around the cabinet area.

      There is no easy way to do this and you'll simply have to decide how much trouble you are willing to go to. Since this area will not be walked on it can usually be reinforced with plywood where the H/W heater and other heavy objects are.

      Randy

    • steveenglish 4 years ago

      thank you will have more problems

    • Rchick 4 years ago

      I have a 1989 Terry Resort. It has linoleum and carpet. I want to replace it all with linoleum. It looks as though the linoleum was laid down first in one piece, then the carpet on top of it, then the interior walls. The walls are on top of a plastic trim piece which has a little round piping n the outsides which acts as trim. Do I have to remove the interior walls and furniture to replace to flooring? How would this be done if I pid a pro to do it? Would they just cut the trim off and butt the new flooring up to the walls and furniture?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Rchick- Yes, when they start building a new RV they start with the vinyl floor covering already installed and then the walls are added, both interior and exterior, as well as, cabinets and table booths and other interior fixtures.

      In your case I would refloor the RV just as you would do in a house. You can always cut the piping away and replace it with ordinary shoe mold to cover the crack between the walls and new floor covering. The same goes for the table booth or other objects. The shoe mold may be nailed or glued, depending on the material it is to be attached to. Good luck and ask for more info if needed.

      Randy

    • Ron 4 years ago

      Randy - I removed the water damaged flooring in my '98 Aerolite and am ready to replace. The materials used were 1/4" plywood, 1-1/2" styrofoam, 1/4" plywood. Should I replace with the same or is there something better on the market now?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Ron, we encountered similar materials in an RV we replaced the floor in. We added more floor joists and used regular house type insulation below the floor and between the joists topped with 3/4 inch treated plywood for the subfloor to prevent future moisture damage.

      Randy

    • Ron 4 years ago

      Randy - a couple more questions:

      1) There are a couple of existing 1-1/2" square aluminum floor joists that I will need to cover. Since there was only 1/4" plywood on it before, using 3/4" will put my floor height 1/2" higher than before and I think this will be a problem at the door. Any thoughts?

      2) What material do you suggest for the additional floor joists - 1-1/2" square alum. tube is expensive! Thanks a lot!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello again Ron, without notching the 3/4 " plywood where the aluminum joists exist it would indeed be 1/2" too high. Perhaps using 1/2" plywood would be simpler to transition at the door using a thinner threshold.

      Wooden floor joists will work fine if you can attach them to the side of the RV or to the existing floor joists. Standard 2x4 studs measure 1 1/2" turned up sidewise. You may have to use self-tapping screws and support brackets--find them at Home Depot or Lowe's-- to do this, but it can be done.

      Randy

    • Karen 4 years ago

      I'm new to camping and the family and I went to look at a used Dutchmen Popup. My husband is a handy man and backyard mechanic. I knew if there was anything major wrong, he'd find it. What he found was that the bottom of the popup is made of particle board, seemingly unprotected. He said if it got wet it will expand and be damage.

      Why is particle board used? I would think just driving in the rain would cause floor problems. Can you help me understand?

      Thanks!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Karen! They used particleboard because it is cheap and increases their profit margin. Sorry, but this is the truth. It's all about profit and nothing else.

      Randy

    • Karen 4 years ago

      Makes perfect sense, thanks Randy. :-)

      How do people protect the particle board on the bottom of the popup? I would hate to think a drive in the rain would bring on floor problems.

      Karen

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Usually there is a vinyl covering of some sort covering the bottom to protect the floor from deterioration, Karen. I always advise a pop-up owner to re-coat the bottom occasionally with a good waterproof sealant, such as Kool-Seal or some other such water retardant, to protect the bottom of the floor. Thanks for the question and for your input, Karen.

      Randy

    • newbieTIM profile image

      newbieTIM 4 years ago

      Hello, first let me say I have found your advice very interesting and helpful. I am going to describe my issue in great detail. I have a 1981 coachman crestline 17.5ft, the floor construction is as follows-on bottom the steel frame running front to back not side to side, then there a sheet of thin metal, on top of that fiberglass insulation, on top of that 3/4in particle board, then the vinyl covering. Now the problem, in the rear on the pass. side the floor is completely gone...the metal rusted out then took the floor with it. Now, my issue is I don't really see how I am going to put all those levels of stuff back in and get the new floor under the wall as going up to the wall and stopping is not an option since the bottom support is completely gone! So I guess my ? is how do I go about trying to squeeze sheet metal between floor joists and steel frame rails since the metal has to go under the joists but over the frame rails, then the same with the rest of the levels??? I have pictures that would be a great visual aid but I have seen you delete others for this so I won't include those right now...Thank you for taking your time to answer us new-to-the-game RVers!!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Tim! I have no problem with you sending pictures if you can do it without using a commercial link to another site. My email info should be on my profile page if HP hasn't removed it. and you can send me the photos there. As far as I know no one has ever sent me photos I removed unless they were on a link I couldn't allow.

      I'm not sure I completely understand your problem but yes, the walls are installed right atop the floor in many cases. You may have to jack the walls up to repair the floor.

      SSSSS

    • newbieTIM profile image

      newbieTIM 4 years ago

      Hmm..I can't seem to find an email address...My basic problem is I am not sure how get a fairly large piece of sheet metal snaked under the existing joists but above the steel beams...then I'm guessing riveting the new sheet metal to the old and sealing it...Just seems like one of those cut yourself 100 times and get really frustrated every 10 sec kinda jobs! haha I will look some more to try and show pics, it's much easier to see. Thanks!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello again, Tim. Send the photos to randygodwin@planttel.net and I'll take a look and see if I can give you some advice. It may be more trouble than you wish to take, though. HP has removed my email info because they are afraid I'll blow the whistle on their little party.

      SSSSS

    • albert woolen 3 years ago

      Randy, your web is excellent for camper owners, I have 34 foot 2003 prowler camper. My floors are rotten plus my wall is to. What should I do to fix this mess? How do I frame the new floor and walls together. Do I have to jack the old wall up. I'm lost. The problem started with a hole in the roof. do I have to frame the inside walls floor first before fixing the roof. The ceiling has a bad spot to Thanks Al

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks for visiting, Al. There are two possible ways of doing the repairs you require. If the walls are still firmly attached to the floor and frame then you can simply remove the rotten material and replace the bad parts of the floor. But if the walls themselves are deteriorated you may have to lift the walls enough to slide the new flooring material beneath them.

      Still, I would add some "L" shaped brackets along the walsl and floor to assure they are firmly attached to each other just for safety's sake. But first I would repair the rood to prevent any future damage or to the ongoing floor and wall repairs. Feel free to ask about any problems you run into if you think I amy advise you. Thanks for the questions.

      Randy

    • hunter1978 3 years ago

      Hello,I have a 99 aerolite Dutchman with floor damage in bathroom area into bunk area,i cant locate any roof leak,the only thing I can guess is the toilet,My wife want let me take it out,I have the wood over foam type of floor.I have removed everything from area now starting to tear out damage area,Where can I buy the original type flooring,wood over foam.Just to be on safe im also replacing roof bladder

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Not sure where you can find this type replacement floor material, Hunter. You might try locating the closest builder of Dutchman campers if you feel you simply have to use the original material. I'd suggest repairing it with common materials instead as we did in the article above. It'd be stronger and last longer too. Thanks for the question and feel free to ask for more info if needed.

      Randy

    • Ray 3 years ago

      Hi Randy love your site. If I were to use 12 inch floor tile for upper deck of my 5th wheel would they be subject to cracking in very cold weather like we get here in Canada -35 C. Thanks Ray

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I really couldn't say for sure, Ray! I have no experience with tile in such cold weather. Perhaps the tile Mfg would have some specs on the effect extreme cold woud have on your choice of tile? You could however, opt for solid vinyl flooring if you are concerned with the tile cracking due to extreme cold.

      Thanks for the question and for reading!

      Randy

    • Ray 3 years ago

      Thanks Randy

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Sorry I couldn't give you a more precise answer to your query, Ray! After all, this is Georgia with little chance of encountering such cold temps.

    • musicjwc 3 years ago

      Have leaking water PVC under Motor Home sink floor. How to get under the sink floor?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      More info needed on the type floor, musicjwc!

    • HLEgan 3 years ago

      I have a 2004 Thor Skamper that started getting a soft floor last spring. We had it put on a seasonal site and they jacked it up and put it on blocks which is when the problem started. The soft spot starts between the bed and outside wall, and runs along the floor under an interior wall to the door. I believe it is also soft under this corner of the bed. I am afraid to tear up the floor for fear it is all the way under the outside wall. If this is the case, what happened, and is it just as easy to fix? We had the roof sealed on a regular basis, and have not seen any leaks anywhere.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @HL Egan--It may be that the floor is subject to moisture other than from the roof. Some RV's have sealed floors that only keep in moisture trapped between the floor space.

      The only way to find out is to tear out the floor. Sorry! :)

    • HLEgan 3 years ago

      Thank you for your quick response. I noticed you mentioned in earlier comments that the cabinets can be quite difficult to remove. Does the same go for the bed? Or is that easier to remove?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      It all depends on how the particular trailer is put together, HL. There are differences in construction from model to model, but there is usually a way to disassemble the cabinets or the beds. Examine them closely to see!

    • rdcsjc 3 years ago

      I am starting a project involving a school bus conversion. I am giving myself 3 years to first find a used school to moving into the motor home making it a full time residence. Is there anyone out there that has any ideas where I can start? I do have a couple places in my mind concering where to purchase the bus, but from there ,this is new to me.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi rdcsjc--I don' t believe you will have a problem finding a good used school bus, nor the plans to convert it into a motorhome. Try googling school bus/ motorhome conversions.

      Randy

    • Kat Mac Kenzie profile image

      Kat Mac Kenzie 3 years ago

      Hello Randy. I have greatly appreciated your posts. I bought a 2006 Gulfstream Cavalier FEMA trailer last year. My dog and I are currently staying in it to save money so we can buy a nice house. Several soft spots have developed in the galley area. There are no water leaks and the roof is new. I am guessing that there was a water leak below the kitchen sink at some point. I am planning on removing the kitchen cabinetry to replace the floor underneath. I am concerned about the power distribution box/electrical that sits under the stove. I am also concerned about the propane lines (not currently being used). Any tips on removing cabinets? Should I buy new cabinets? Also, what type of insulation was used in your photos? Does it matter or can I buy cheap stuff? Is pine 3/4 plywood alright or does it need to be a hardwood like oak (much more expensive)? In a previous comment you mentioned sealing the doorframe. What product is used to reseal a doorway? I thought it would be a good idea as we sometimes get nasty storms in early summer. Is it an outdoor silicone? Any other tips? I do not plan to do this project until July when I am sure to have dry weather. Thank you.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Kat. A friend of mine bought one of the FEMA trailers not too many years ago and the plumbing it leaked the first time he hooked the water up. Apparently the fixtures used in these campers was not up to par at the time they were constructed.

      Most the time the cabinets may be removed by unscrewing them from the walls and there's no need to buy new ones. Even if you must make a few cuts with a saw they can usually be replaced with very little problem if you are handy with tools.

      What concerns you with the electrical box and propane lines? Do these need to be removed before the repairs are made?

      3/4 pine plywood should be fine for replacement flooring and treated pine plywood is even better in case of future leaks or plumbing problems. Any sort of insulation will work fine and regular outdoor silicone caulking made for windows and doors will do for sealing purposes. You may find this any Lowe's or Home Depot store.

      Feel free to ask for more info if you run into any problems with the repairs. I'll do my best to help you if I can. Thanks for reading and for the questions.

      --RG

    • Jessica 3 years ago

      Hey there, this is the first time I have visited this blog and you seem like a saint! My fiancée and I just bought a 1973 Dodge Coachmen Reo Pace Arrow (we can't figure out what the name of it is, lol) and we'll be remodeling the entire inside. The engine was completely overhauled about 5 years ago and it runs like it's brand new (or better!), so the inside is our challenge. I have about a thousand questions for you, would it be possible to email back and forth and pick your brain sometimes? You can find my blog at moondreamsandmagic.blogspot.com - there are lots of pics of my RV there and if you could offer any help, we would so appreciate it! As for floors, I noticed that y'all kept a lot of the flooring that looks pretty damaged - even with the obvious discoloration from previous liquid/moisture damage. This is safe/ok? There is no damage to them structurally? What if there is some slight (appears dead) molding/mildew as well? In such an older vehicle, it seems that every piece of wood we remove is splintering. I note above a gentleman also asked about removing sink cabinets. Our sink cabinet box is in relatively good shape (still very sturdy) but all of the doors were severely damaged from long-term moisture (it's wet in Louisiana all year long, and this RV lived at a house in the swamps for awhile). We pulled all of the doors and the inside of the sink area is just disgusting, has a couple of squirrel nests in it and really needs to be pulled and cleaned and re-installed for me to feel good about living in there...With these older RVs that are built more like a house, is it still not recco'd to remove the cabinet box? The wood is incredibly solid - someone said it might even be teak, but we can't seem to confirm that. And it seems unlikely. The walls are all paneling, all peeling so they need to also be pulled and there are several cabinet boxes that are in terrific shape that we were hoping to extract and reinstall. If you take a look at my blog, you can see that there was some moisture damage (lots of it) to the walls and what appeared to be some termites as well. HELP!!!!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Jessica, and thanks for the questions. The only reason we didn't remove the cabinets in this repair job was because they were installed in such a manner there was a good chance of destroying them if we did so. Besides, the floor beneath them was solid enough to support anything stored there. The cabinets were not damaged by the moisture in any way.

      By all means remove them if you can do so and use them again if they are sound. We did indeed remove all of the damaged flooring in our repair job as it was only in the kitchen area.

      I did look at your blog and you have some great ideas for your new project. Feel free to ask any questions you may have. Check out my other RV How-to articles by clicking on my photo at the top of the page.

      Thanks for your questions.

      Randy

    • Jessica 3 years ago

      Thanks for the reply, Randy :) And thanks for checking out my page, yes the ideas seem to come very easily lol, it's the application that is such a huge undertaking!

      I really appreciate the advice. Do you have a recommended method of determining if the floor is salvageable, or is it more of a gut instinct thing? Our floor does not feel "soft," but it looks much worse than the floor above (probably because it's 30 years older, but it still makes me nervous since I'm not an expert). I can try to take and post some more detailed photographs to my blog this week.

      I'm glad to hear that the cabinets could be salvaged as we were hoping. Do you have a particular way or any tips that you advise for removing the cabinet boxes in order to keep them from getting too damaged?

      Oh one more question...how long did this floor overhaul take altogether? Thanks so much for your help, I'll be bookmarking all of your guides and returning often. I really appreciate it.

      Jessica :)

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @ Jessica- I know of no sure fire way do determining if the floor is still structurally sound without remove a section of it and taking a look. But if your floor feels solid you may just put put another layer of plywood atop it if you are worried about it.

      As for the cabinets, they are so many different ways of installing cabinets into RVs I cannot advise you without more info. If yours are constructed with screws and not simply stapled together and glued, they should be no problem to remove.

      We replaced the floor in the Dutchman in about 3 days but take in consideration we are experienced in this sort of thing. Please do ask if you need help as others will certainly benefit from your experience. You can email me at randygodwin@planttel.net if you need more info or ask on any of my RV articles. Good Luck with your remodeling. :)

    • Jessica 3 years ago

      Thanks very much Randy, for everything. We will definitely keep everyone posted on every stitch of progress we have (including all the hiccups!) on our blog too, and I'm saving your email to send you some questions when we get more in depth. If I can post questions here too, I'm happy to do that! Anywhere we can get a little advice and give a helping hand to someone else who might come behind us trying to do the same thing would be great with us. We are so grateful to the wonderful community of RV folks who have given us advice all along the way. It really is like a big-little-family!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      No problem, Jessica. Always glad to help other RVers with their projects and repairs. And thanks for relating your experience rebuilding your RV as I'm sure it will helpful to other RV owners. Keep in touch!

    • MiciMarie 3 years ago

      Hi Randy,

      I have a 1975 Forester 22' or so. After I measured the unit, my father informed me that I need to include the tongue in the length. Oops. My question is also regarding the flooring. Upon entering the trailer, I noticed the floor was slightly squishy. Now it worse after cleaning it out. The floor is sectioned off from all the years and it is in 4 stages. Under the dinette is the old carpeting. From the dinette to the first section of cabinets, the old linoleum was ripped up. Then the Gaucho area is 3/4in plywood covered in blue carpeting. My main concern is the repaired portion in back and the old linoleum. It past squishy and I know I need to replace it before more damage occurs. My father wants to just cover the whole floor up with treated lumber and then something water resistant. After taking the cabinet doors off, I noticed that the plumbing for the shower, space under the fridge compartment, and the window/wall by the gaucho all have water damage. The opposite side of the trailer where the sink and stove are placed is just fine. What should I do about the damage and the floors? Please help. I want my vintage pumpkin to useful for years to come. I also need to make it possible for someone with allergies and asthma to enter the space. Thank you and have a great Memorial Weekend!!

      MiciMarie

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello, MiciMarie. The only way to totally rid your RV of any harmful molds after water damage takes place is to rip up the floor and clean it thoroughly. There's just no other way to get to the areas where mold grows.

      It may be possible to remove the damaged areas only and to clean underneath the undamaged areas enough. I'd really need more info on how your floor is constructed to be more helpful to you.

    • Mike 3 years ago

      Hi Randy,

      A little less than a year ago I bought a Coachmen travel trailer from what I thought was a nice family, but I think the guy was just a broker trying to get rid of thing on behalf of someone who couldn't get rid of it. Looked and smelled clean, thought it was a solid buy (it was also my first time buying).

      Long story short, when I got it home I noticed soft spots in the floor that were cleverly covered by the broker. I think I've sourced the leak to a broken fridge vent on the roof. The soft spots are at the door, and in front of the bathroom door. They're two logical paths for water to travel from the roof vent.

      Most of the wood (probably 60-70%) in the trailer feels strong, but because it's in two diffenret locations, am I'm looking at an entire tear out? Is it possible to replace two different but somewhat connected sections? I can supply pics when I get the job started, but I wanted to get some advice beforehand.

      THANK YOU!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Mike,

      There's no need to refloor the entire trailer if the remaining material is solid. You can tell when you remove the damaged areas of flooring how bad the water damage extends to the surrounding area. If you need some advice when you get started then please do send some photos of the floor. I'll be glad to advise you if I can.

      Thanks for reading and for the question, Mike.

      Randy

    • Rae 3 years ago

      I have an 06 jay feather and the sub floor was also rotten... So I decided to remove that as well... But there is a black tarp that is under the subfloor... How do I remove that? Do I have 2 take off the trim on the outside to get 2 it?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I would simply cut it along the inside of the wall, Rae. Don't bother with removing the outside trim.

      --RG

    • Mike Bruno 3 years ago

      I have a 2003 Vanguard 5th wheel 24.8 made in Canada by peek mfg. I would like to know how to remove the rear outside panel , the one the tail light are mounted on this is a hard body type, also what i am expected to find , 2x2 construction or! I think i could have a water problem, possible dry rot! can you help thanks M.B.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Mike. I couldn't find a photo of your particular camper, but I suspect the walls may be constructed of Styrofoam sandwiched between two or more sheets of aluminum as is the camper used in this article. I can't be sure of course, as there are so many different construction techniques and materials used over the last ten years. Sorry to be of so little help in this case.

      RG

    • Patrick 3 years ago

      I'm replacing the front portion of my RV floor in a 24 foot Kit Road Ranger. So far I've taken out the old particle board floor and am ready to install some new joists and then the plywood. My question has to do with the insulation between the joists. The bottom of the trailer is covered with a black plastic barrier and I removed the old insulation that had become wet and soggy - acted like a good sponge, which isn't what I want. I am tempted to just leave the insulation out and just cover the joists with the plywood. Does the insulation serve any purpose other than just that - insulating the bottom of the trailer? What do you think of leaving it out? I mainly only use the trailer for my annual deer hunting trip in the fall and maybe a time or two in the summer. Thanks for your input.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Patrick, sorry to be so long in responding to your question but I've not had access to the internet for the last 5 days.

      There's no problem with leaving out the insulation as it simply gives you a bit more....well....insulation during the cold and hot times of the year. simply seal all the cracks well and you should be okay.

      Thanks for reading and for the question. :)

      Randy

    • Patrick 3 years ago

      Thanks for your reply. I hope you realize what an incredible resource you have been all these years with this website and your excellent advice. Thanks for being there!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Glad to be of service, Patrick. I enjoy helping RV owners solve their problems, as well as, saving a few bucks in the process. Thanks for the nice comments. :)

      Randy

    • Patti Short 3 years ago

      I'd like to replace the carpet & linoleum in our travel trailer. Everything I've read suggests self stick tiles or planks. My concern is that the tiles will 'pop' in the cold weather and I'll be fixing them constantly. Here in Nebraska our winters get pretty cold.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Patti, I understand your concerns with the temps affecting the plank flooring. Using linoleum or other types of vinyl flooring is fine.

      --RG

    • Matt G. 3 years ago

      Randy- First off, great website you have here and thank you for sharing all this wonderful knowledge with everyone. I am look at buying an 09 trailcruiser and when I was inspecting it I discovered what I will call a damp area on the underside of one of the slide outs and was a bit concerned. I don't think that the slide out floor is really structurally weakened other than the fact that the particleboard is wet and will flake apart if scraped. This particular type of slide out uses a cable system and rollers that roll along the bottom of the slide out going in and out. The area in question looks to be about maybe 1 foot by 1 foot, I think water ran down the side and underneath since there is no drip edge. What would be the best course of action to take to remedy this seeing that there are no joists or anything in a slide out, is it possible to patch only that area? Look forward to hearing you response...Thanks!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Matt, and thanks for reading my RV hubs. I'm sorry but I'm unfamiliar with the type of RV you are looking to buy. It should however be possible to patch the bad spot without replacing the whole slide-out floor in some manner. Do you know what type of support is used beneath said floor?

      --RG

    • Matt G 3 years ago

      I honestly dont see a whole of other supports under the slide, it, s a smaller 6 ft slide. I guess it probably has some sort of bracing under it but I dont recall seeing any. Do you have any ballpark guess as to what a place might charge to either patch the floor or replace the entire slide out floor? If I decide to buy it I would like to leave some room in my offer in case I cant fix it myself. Thanks

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I'd definitely take in consideration the repair to the slide-out when making an offer, Matt. it may be easier to replace the entire floor with a single sheet of plywood than repairing the damaged area. I always try to use a stronger material than what originally was used in the RV.

      If you think you'd be better off having someone else do the repairs rather than do it yourself, then take some photos of the damaged area and shop around at several RV repair shops before choosing one for the job. I'd be glad to look at them myself if you like.

      You can contact me at randygodwin@planttel.net

    • matt g 3 years ago

      Thanks for the advice. I think ultimately the best thing to do would be to replace junky particleboard with plywood on the entire slide. While I have you, what's your expert opinion on kitchens on a slide out? Something to avoid or is it fine as long as its checked regularly for leaks?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I have no experience with a kitchen slide-out, Matt. I do foresee problems with the plumbing as it has to be flexible for the slide to operate correctly, though.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      BB is a nice guy, but I fail to find his work very interesting. At least, not as much as some of his fans apparently do.

    • Lena 3 years ago

      Hi Randy.. You're a wealth of information! I have an 03 Keystone Montana 5th wheel with 3 slides.. Cat's have anointed the living room carpet in a contest to see who's boss and I can't handle it anymore!!! the carpet has to go. the camper has an island kitchen.. hardwood floor between island and kitchen slide is fine.. other side of island is carpet all the way to living room slide wall and the full length of living room area. We want to take out the carpet and put in linoleum tiles. We're stumped as to how to accommodate the slide coming in over the tiles and not tearing them up. Any idea's?? the slide itself has carpet and we want to take that out too.. living room and slideout floors to be tiled. Bear in mind I'm legally blonde and will probably screw it up anyway but can't afford the pro's to come do it.. Any help appreciated.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Lena, and thanks for the questions. Does the slides operate over an area which now has carpet? If so, the extra clearance created by the difference in thickness between the carpet and tiles should allow the slide to operate even better. Or perhaps I'm misunderstanding your question? A bit more info may help me assist you so please clarify. And thanks for reading. :)

      Randy

    • Austin F 3 years ago

      Hi Randy,

      I just picked up a 35' Mountaneer. While cleaning underneath, I removed the cover panels and found huge amount of rat droppings between the plastic sheeting and the floor. Any ideas for an easy fix?

    • P.Ash 3 years ago

      Hi Randy,

      We have a camper trailer and the toilet overflowed. Some went between the floor and the bottom soaking the insulation. Any advice on how to repair?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi P. Ash, if can get access to the insulation from either the bottom or the top of the floor, then you can dry it out with a hair dryer if the material isn't too damaged.

    • KarenBlue 2 years ago

      Hi! Love your site. My questions is: I want to add shelves on the side of our 2001 Trail lite R-Vision trailer. I went to the dealer to find out about the wall studs and they didn't know what type or how to locate them to use as anchors for the shelves. Can you help?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Karen and thanks for the question. Since there are so many materials used in the construction of walls in today's RV's, I cannot give you a definite answer. If you can't use a standard stud finder to locate any studs in the wall then you must use some sort of anchor to mount the shelves. I'd be careful to not overload the shelves with books or other heavy objects just to be on the safe side though.

      An exploratory drill hole may give you some indication of the strength of the wall materials if all else fails. Sorry to be of so little help in this case. :) Fell free to ask for more info if you think I may be of service and thanks for reading.

      --RG

    • KarenBlue 2 years ago

      Thank you for your response. Guess I will use the free standing type of shelves and not drill into the walls. Just can't get up the courage to drill. lol

    • Randy 2 years ago

      2014 Rushmore, I have a slide that the rollers have damaged the fiberglass under the slide. How do I install glide plates??

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Sorry Randy, I have no experience with this repair. I suggest you contact the maker of your RV. If this is a common problem they should be able to help you out.

      RG

    • Austinjewlz 2 years ago

      OMG-I flooded my dad's camper trailer. Help!!! Heme eps it at my place-The temps were dropping the other night and I ran out to turn the faucets on like I always do when it gets cold but the outside drain had been closed. I went to check on things two hours later and found water pouring out the bottom of the trailer. The trailer leans to the front slightly so all the water drained down through the floor vents. We have had the space heater and fans on constantly but haven't checked the storage compartments underneathe, the heating system or sliding mechanism yet. On the surface the interior appears to be ok-the particle board on the sliding part looks just a tiny bit warped at one corner but not too bad hopefully. I just don't know what to expect-should I be worried about long term damage? I think it was the bathtub that actually overflowed-it is in the back of the camper. The water wasn't on very high but the hold must have already been pretty full because there seemed to be a LOT of water. I think it is called a Prowler? About 19ft? Help. What can I be doing, what do I need to check???

    • Bruce S 2 years ago

      I have a 2008 R-Vision Trail Lite 21 ft. travel trailer. After noticing a soft spot in front of the door I finally started the repair today. A hot water heater leak was the apparent source of the leak and the soft area extends forward from the back of the hot water heater space to just behind the forward edge of the door and towards the middle of the trailer about two feet, perhaps more under the adjacent bathroom cabinet. The floor construction is (from the bottom) a plastic membrane, a 1/4" piece of thoroughly rotten plywood, about 2" of styrofoam, another 1/4" piece of rotten ply and then linoleum. Any water that enters the floor simply has no way to escape and can spread far and wide. The side wall frame is 2" square aluminum tubes and there is a steel I-beam running fore and aft towards the inboard side of the damaged area. I removed the door, hot water heater, and the aft closet, and cleaned out the wet stuff and styrofoam down to the plastic membrane at the bottom and now I will rebuild the floor. How do you think it best to attach my new floor piece to the aluminum side framing piece? Screwed in wooden cleat? Aluminum angle? With this sandwich type of floor there does not seem to be a way of adding a cleat to the existing intact floor to help support the new repair. Would you use any styrofoam either under the floor or in a layer of the floor in this repair? I live in Florida so a cold spot in front of the door is not too worrisome. I plan on soaking everything in Dr.Rot penetrating epoxy to help with waterproofing if there is ever another leak and spraying the bottom of the floor with some sort of undercoating to help seal up any holes in the plastic membrane. I may even think about adding a layer of thin fiberglass cloth to the top to help strengthen the repair. I think self sticking linoleum tiles of a contrasting color might work to replace the old linoleum that was destroyed in tearing out the rot. Any suggestions and advice will be most appreciated.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Austin, hopefully the damage won't be too bad since you caught it early enough. I really can't say for sure until it dries out completely. Often the first time this happens the water will drain or evaporate enough to prevent any long term damage. Get back to me if you need some repair advice after the RV gets dried out completely.

      Randy

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Bruce, it sounds as if you are doing the best you can with the repairs so far. I would use some ell shaped metal brackets to attach the floor to the walls and add more stability to both floor and walls.

      You can also replace the styrofoam insulation with ordinary fiberglass if you think you need the added protection from the cold. Feel free to ask for more tips and advice if needed. Thanks for reading and the question.

      --RG

    • Robyn 2 years ago

      We have the same problem in our Tahoe by Thor. My husband just replaced the main floor but we are at a loss as far as floor coverings go. We purchased vinyl tile but found the adhesive is only rated to 50 degrees. We live in mn and even when stored indoors it gets to below freezing. Is there a particular adhesive we should use? Or what would you recommend? Feel free to email me at robynleeskwira@hotmail.com

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Robyn, thanks for reading. Perhaps you would be better off with one of the vinyl floor coverings. They should adhere to the floor surface better than the vinyl tiles as they are often used in colder climates.

      Randy

    • Johnny (South Georgia) 2 years ago

      Hello Randy,

      I have a 2006 Everest 5th wheel made by Keystone. The floor on one of our largest slides beneath the sleeper sofa seems to be falling out through the bottom of the slide out. I have felt around and can not feel any soft spots from beneath the slide but it has fallen about 1/2 inch. We can see light coming from the sides of the floor in a couple of areas. When the slide is retracted, the floor moves upward into its proper (or very close to) position. We have battled moister problems due to condensation in the past. I feel the screws may have rusted into.

      How is the floor attached? I see some small screws on a piece of trim on two sides of the slide at the proper floor height. I was thinking about removing these screws and jacking the floor back to its proper position and shooting in a lot of 3 inch screws around the inner perimeter from beneath the slide hoping to hit some form of stripping along the outer edge.

      My question to you is how is the floor attached? I assume it is screwed along the three outside sides and is merely held by these screws. I do not want to open things up without some prior knowledge before hand.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Johnny! I'm not familiar with how the slide-out is constructed in your particular RV, but I do think the screws may be rusted out beneath the floor. I'm sorry not to be able to give you more info as there are so many makes and types of construction used on these RVs.

      You may have to tear into the slide-out to find the problem or either see if the dealer can assist you with more info.

      Randy

    • Johnny 2 years ago

      Thanks. I was hoping someone may know how the floor is installed.

      Johnny

    • drew 2 years ago

      Need help to adjust a slid out in a dutchman classic 240 1995 it was rotten i repiared and now does not slide proper

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Sorry Drew, I'd have to see a picture of the slide-out.

    • w.l. rayborn 2 years ago

      randy I have 30 foot yellow stone camper with a bad roof 1986 model I live in brookhaven miss.where can ifind the metal

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Mr. Rayborn, have you tried looking at mobile home repair services for replacement metal roofing for your camper? Some of the older models of mobile homes used this same type of roofing.

      --RG

    • NGE 2 years ago

      Can a person buy replacement cabinets for a Park Model Home. We have new Pergo and need to replace the cabinets and regular cabinets are not as deep and would leave a space between cabinets and Pergo.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Unless you can find them at the company which built the camper, or have them custom made, I don't know where you can find them, NGE. Sorry!

    • CWB 2 years ago

      The vinyl floor in are 08 Jayco cracked this winter. We thought about using the peel and stick tiles but are worried about them staying down with temperature variation. Any thoughts on this?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Very cold temps may affect the peel and stick tiles and cause them to come loose from the floor, CWB. I'd consult someone at a builder's supply or a flooring center to see what they recommend you to use. I live in a warm climate and don't have your problem.

    • Colleen Clancy profile image

      Colleen Clancy 2 years ago

      I have a 1983 Fleetwood Wilderness that I have been restoring. Underneath there is some sort of metal underbelly. There are quite a few holes which I cut up a tarp and glued to the metal for the winter to keep out critters and moisture. Well, it kept out the critters but a lot of moisture got in. I tore off the tarp pieces and pulled out the wet insulation and now I need to repair the holes. What should I use? Do I put some sort of metal back under there like roof metal? Do I use a poly type tarp that goes under a trailer? The camper is stationary at a campground. It has never been trailered. It has been at the campground since it was purchased new. I saw all the camper redo's on Pinterest and decided I needed a "project" but I am getting discouraged really quickly because it is turning out to be way more work than I expected. The person who sold it to me said it had no leaks but I found several and have torn half the camper apart. It looks really good right now except for the section underneath that I have torn the rusted metal out and I have torn the back corner in the bunk area out because it is leaking. What is my best and most inexpensive option for enclosing the area underneath that is exposed right now? Thank you so much for your help.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Colleen, I'd recommend fixing all of the roof leaks before considering what to cover the bottom of the RV with. If you seal the bottom before the leaks are stopped you will be removing the bottom cover before long because the moisture will collect there. Does the roof consist of a metal covering or a rubber material?

      In the RV featured in this article the moisture trapped beneath the floor caused the wood and insulation to rot therefore causing the floor to be replaced. If you get the leaks stopped almost any covering will work fine for enclosing the bottom of your RV.

      Randy

    • e Chunik 2 years ago

      I have a 1999? Tahoe Glide Lite 5th wheel with a non electric slide out. There is extensive floor damage from a previous leak and the slide out needs to be removed completely. Can you tell us how to do this? All the moulding, screws, etc have been removed and it just seems to have a stop in the track under the slide out but we can't figure out how to get it right out. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi e Chunik, I've very little experience with repairing slide-out floors but it would seem a relatively easy fix. Is there a cover strip which can be removed to access the stop? I'll see if I can find out anything to help you figure it out.

      Randy

    • Pat 2 years ago

      So... I have a '69 vintage little "glamoer" that I love, but the back wall, in the bathroom under an air conditioner is rotten. Any advice or resources on fixing a rotten wall?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Pat, I too have a 69 model camper as well as a 59 Scotty Sportsman which I've repaired the walls in using luan or either paneling turned backwards in order to match the paint scheme. It's pretty simple job once you have removed the damaged wood, as long as the wall studs--or whatever is in place to attach the paneling to--is in good shape. Feel free to ask for more advice if you need it.

      Randy

    • Judy Tyler 2 years ago

      I am replacing damaged laminate flooring in our 5th wheel. We have a slide and even nailing down the beginning piece along the slide, when the camper slides in it pulls the nails and moves the laminate. I didn't pay attention when we took it out, but kept the pieces that were in the sides. Do we try to slide a piece under the slide? Any help please!!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Judy, I really am afraid to advise you as there are so many different slide-outs made for different models of campers. Are you replacing the flooring with the same thickness as the original material? Merely a slight difference in thickness may cause your problem. Sorry I cannot be of more assistance on this question but please ask for more info if you need it during the repair process. I wish I could see the slide-out in person but unfortunately I can't.

      Randy

    • Janet Meeds 2 years ago

      Randy would you have any idea why the vinyl flooring in my KZ Outdoorsman is splitting and peeling away from the sub floor.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Janet, there are several reasons this may be happening. The first is, of course, the age of the floor material. I assume this isn't relevant or you would have mentioned it in your post.

      The second reason could be the type of climate or environment the camper has been exposed to. I have no idea where you reside, but very frigid temperatures can adversely affect both vinyl flooring materials, and the adhesives used to bond them to the sub-floor. The same may be said for very damp climates and extreme heat.

      And the last reason is because the floor was at sometime exposed to excess moisture of some sort. All this assuming the materials or adhesives themselves weren't inferior in some manner.

      I hope this helps but feel free to ask for further info if needed.

      Thanks for the question!

      Randy

    • Janet Meeds 2 years ago

      Thanks for your prompt reply, I figured the rotten winter we had here in Manitoba, Canada had a lot to do with the floor problem as our TTs have always been kept outside and we've never this kind of problem before. Since texting you I have finally spoken with one of the techs at our rv repair place and he said about every 3rd unit coming in has some sort of floor concern. Thanks again for you swift reply.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Pleased to help any way I can, Janet. :)

    • wandabr 2 years ago

      We have a 98 Layton travel trailer. We have had leaks in the past that have been repaired as soon as noticed. Now the floor in front of the bathroom sink and beside the toilet is very soft. How do you fix this? It is soft under sink/cabinet. Must the toilet be removed?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I don't see any other option but to remove the toilet during the floor repair process, Wanda. It shouldn't be a difficult task as the bolts retaining the toilet are possibly attached to the rotten floor. You may be able to replace the floor underneath the cabinets by jacking them up and sliding the new floor material beneath them. Anything else I can advise you on?

    • Brian 2 years ago

      I have a tipout in a 2008 keystone raptor in the bedroom that the floor has rotted where the slide bracket is bolted to the floor,my question is can I replace the floor from the bottom and will walls stay in place while I do it Thanks.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Are speaking of the tip-out floor, Brian? You may have to brace up the walls until the repairs are made to the floor. Be sure you reattach the walls to the floor securely in the repair process.

    • wandabr 2 years ago

      Thanks for the reply. We are not huge do-it-yourselfers so I'm not if this is something we can tackle. The flooring in the bath continues through out the camper to the carpet in front. Thanks though.

    • Brian 2 years ago

      Yes Randy it's the tip out floor,if I remove the trim on the outside of tipout at the bottom would the walls remain intact held together by the corners and roof so I could remove floor from the bottom.thanks for the quick reply

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I wish I could confirm that the walls would stay together until the repairs to the floor was made, but there are so many different designs for these tip-outs and slide-outs I'm not sure exactly how yours is assembled. Most of the time anything you can remove easily can be reassembled in the same manner. In other words, any damage you cause by the repair process can usually be fixed in some manner. I'd be pleased to help you with any problems encountered if you decide to take on the job yourself.

      Randy

    • Pamela Bush profile image

      howtopam 2 years ago from Alberta, Canada

      Hi Randy;

      Nice work on the flooring. I may need to fix mine at some time in the future. But my roof and ceiling are a different story. I have to start thinking of ideas for repairing both. Do you have any thoughts on what I may be dealing with? Any input would be appreciated.

      Thank you.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks for the kudos on the flooring, Pamela. :) What sort of repairs to the roof and ceiling are you anticipating? I'll be glad to offer what advice I can.

      Randy

    • Pamela Bush profile image

      howtopam 2 years ago from Alberta, Canada

      Thanks for responding Randy;

      Water damage on the interior ceiling and upper walls of my 1977 Fleetwood 28 foot fifth wheel. I was wondering if I start the repairs from the inside of the unit by removing the interior wall paneling or if I should begin the repairs by removing the exterior roof tin and outer metal siding? I may have to replace some of the wall studding and some of the plywood roof sheathing and stringers.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I wouldn't remove the roofing tin unless it's absolutely essential to repair the roof, Pam. It would be easier to repair the leaks in the roof by coating it with a rubber based sealant before attempting to repair the interior. you may be able to replace the stringers and studs without removing the roof at all.

    • Pamela Bush profile image

      howtopam 2 years ago from Alberta, Canada

      Thanks for your prompt reply Randy;

      I was thinking that the work is probably properly done from the inside. I wanted to get your opinion on the idea. I guess I will remove the cupboards that are fastened to the upper wall and ceiling and then remove the interior wall paneling and see what condition the studding is in. I will also pull the ceiling paneling off and expose the roof supports. I should be able to replace any studding or supports once all are exposed from the inside.

      Thank you for your input.

      Pamela

    • jerry 2 years ago

      I don't see the wood floor going under the outer walls these guys run the floor up to the wall is this half ass

    • mgeorge1050 profile image

      Alan 2 years ago from West Georgia

      Great article, very informative.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Actually it's easier to repair the floor if it doesn't go underneath the walls, Jerry.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks, MGeorge! :)

    • imtii profile image

      Imtiaz Ahmed 2 years ago from Dhaka, Bangladesh

      Nice Hub. What transformation made from junk to whole awesome RV. Nice going Randy. :)

    • Leonard 2 years ago

      Randy is there anywhere I can order the carpet for a slide? Or if I install the replacement carpet myself, how would I bind the open end that moves when the slide moves in and out?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Leonard, I'm really not familiar with all of the different methods used by the RV industry enough to advise you on slide-out repair. It is on my things-to-learn list but I spend so much time answering questions both here and other places I haven't got around to it. Have you examined the type of mechanism used in your slide-out yet?

      Many times RV repairs are simply basic building techniques and it's hard to make mistakes which can't be remedied. Good luck on your repairs and I'd like to know how they turn out. :)

    • Colleen 2 years ago

      This is not about floors but I'm not sure where to ask this question. The answers here are so good that I know you can help me. As I mentioned in a previous post I have a 1983 Fleetwood Wilderness that I am rehabbing. My neighbor so kindly winterized the camper for me and added a by pass.. I knew enough to hook up the water and let it run when I opened up the camper in May to let all the antifreeze drain out. But, I am afraid to go any further. I want to have hot water but I'm not sure what to do now that the antifreeze is drained out. I have read a lot online but I'm still a little hesitant because I don't want to ruin the how water tank by doing something wrong. Can someone help me? I can send pictures of my by pass hookup and water tank but I don't see how to attach to this message. Thank you so much for helping. This board is awesome!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Colleen, if you have water coming out of the hot water taps and you're not losing water from any connection, the hot water tank is ready to be used. As long as water is in the tank there's no chance of it being harmed.

    • Colleen 2 years ago

      I have water coming out of both taps because I opened then both & drained the antifreeze. My question now is how to fill the hot wAter tank. There is a gold bypass switch do I turn it so it let's water into the tank & do I turn on the water pump while it is filling up? I don't want to burn anything out. Can I send you a picture of the tank w/ bypass so I no that I am turning it in the proper position? It's an old camper & I don't want to ruin the tank or pump & have to replace either one. I should have written down instructions last year when my neighbor blew the lines, added the bypass, & added the antifreeze for me. I sure will after this! Thank you for your help!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Colleen--go to my profile page and go to fan mail and you can send me an email with a photo included. I'll be happy to help you if I understand how the system works.

      Randy

    • Colleen 2 years ago

      Randy, I didn't see fan mail I think I posted to yr Facebook.

    • Denise MacLean 2 years ago

      We have our 2012 Layton Joey Select 307 model parked seasonal. We shut the water off at the incoming water tap and went home for 10 days. Unbeknownst to is the tap had a leak and we the water pressure off the valve in the toilet didn't have enough pressure to hold it closed (I'm told it's a ball valve ?) anyhow... The toilet over flowed for 10 days, ran down the heating duct in the bathroom and along the duct work under the trailer, then spilling out into the bottom getting trapped in the vapour barrier. Once noticed we slit the vapour barrier to let the water out and within days noticed soft spots in the floor. These run from behind the fridge to the back living section. Would it be easier to cut out the damaged sections or replace the entire floor? Also what would you suggest we repair the vapour barrier with? Thanks

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Denise, repairing the soft spots would be easier to accomplish if they aren't too many of them. It all depends on what is beneath the floor to attach the new floor material to. You won't know for sure until you get the damaged areas removed an see what is there to work with.

      You should be able to find the proper replacement materials for the vapor barrier at an RV repair center or online. I'll be glad to advise you when you begin the repairs.

      Randy

    • Colleen Clancy profile image

      Colleen Clancy 2 years ago

      Hi Randy, I sent you an email thru your Facebook email because I did not see fan mail on your profile page. If you could answer here on hub pages that would be great. Thank you for your help.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Fan mail is clearly listed on my profile page, Colleen. I haven't been able to find your message on my FB page. :(

    • Canadian RV'er soft floor 2 years ago

      I had water leak through emergency exit window. Water from roof would drip on window hinge and pool. It would work its way into the trailer as the underside of the windows are not caulked. Replaced part of the wall and most of the floor. Took alll the rotten 1/4" ply and styrofoam out. Placed a 1" high density insulating blue foam then a 3/4" pressure treated plywood to fill space between aluminium frame tubing. I then covered the entire floor with 1/2" plywood screwed every 6". You could play basketball on that floor.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Sounds as if you have the repairs finished nicely, CRV! It's difficult not to make the repairs stronger than the original as many RV makers skimp on the cost of construction. Thanks for your input and time! :)

      Randy

    • radams798 profile image

      radams798 2 years ago from Royse City, Texas

      I have a fiberglass sided 2006 Rvision FEMA travel trailer. It's VERY nice, BUT...it's got a few soft spots in the flooring, which is no big deal thanks to your post I can fix it. What bothers me is while I'm driving, if I hit a bump or something, the whole top of the trailer(tip meaning walls to roof) bounce and separate from the floor. How do the walls secured to the floor. It's like the whole top of the trailer separate from the floor.How dip I fix this? PLEASE HELP

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      In some cases an ell (L) shaped metal bracket should be installed to the floor and wall to secure the walls to the floor. Place them at intervals and screw them securely to both wall and floor to prevent any movement while moving the RV.

      Randy

    • radams798 profile image

      radams798 2 years ago from Royse City, Texas

      Oh wow, really? That simple? VERY COOL! Thank you. Now, I ASSUME there are braces in the wall to attach to? And the same corresponding braces in the floor? THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR ABUSE AND HELP

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      The floor and wall should be sturdy enough to allow proper attachment of the brackets if you put enough of them in place, radams. :)

    • radams798 profile image

      radams798 2 years ago from Royse City, Texas

      Ok, sorry to keep hounding you, but what size brackets are best to be used? I did a quick fix on my flooring, and so far has worked good so I'll share. The places I noticed the weak spots were at the very front and rear. I purchased 2 large cans of the minwax branded polyurethane in the blue can and first, pulled up carpet, then died out floor thoroughly with hair dryer, then soaked floor down with Clorox mold and mildew killer, and let that dry. Then I drilled tiny, almost microscopic holes throughout weak area. Finally poured a can(spreading out evenly throughout the whole problem area. The tiny holes allowed the polyurethane to totally soak and saturate the particle board. Let that dry for about 4 days, then applied another coat. Turned that rotten wood into almost cement. Please let me know your opinion on this cheap "quick fix" method. And thank you again.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      As a rule, the larger brackets you use the less you need of them. I'd think some around 2 or 3 inches wide would do nicely. Look around at a Lowe's or Home Depot for framing brackets the correct size.

      Your repairs to the soft spots sounds great if it continues to be solid. There is a product which hardens and solidifies degraded wood which may also provide the same effect as the polyurethane you used but I'm not sure about using it for bad floors. Let me know how it works out if you don't mind. Thanks for the comments and questions. :)

      Randy

    • radams798 profile image

      radams798 2 years ago from Royse City, Texas

      Yes sir, again thank you for your help and GOD bless you. I believe you are single handedly responsible for saving people thousands of dollars

    • Moses 2 years ago

      How has the laminate tile flooring held up? I have heard mixed reviews on using the self adhesive laminate flooring. I was told I would get gaps and the tiles would start to lift with temperature fluctuations along with travel. I was planning on replacing the flooring this weekend but now have mixed reviews. It seems that many among the TT community recommend using the floating floor by Allure... any thoughts or comments would be appreciated. I would like to only do this project once. Thanks

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Moses, the floating laminate floor works well as it flexes as the camper is being moved, unlike the adhesively bound floors.

    • Moses 2 years ago

      Thanks for the comment. In your experience how has the laminate adhesive tiles held up? Does the above project still have the flooring installed and are there gaps or tiles popping out?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      The above project is still holding up well, Moses. Keep in mind however, it is used in the south mainly and hasn't been through very cold winters.

    • TrishBbarron 2 years ago

      Randy Godwin

      I am trying to repair the floor of a cub supermatic. My daughter bought it a few years ago second hand. It is probably a 199? model and does do have a winch. The floor seems to have lost the lining between the flooring and the base that goes down when it is opened. Is it possible to simply cut the lino out at the edges, replace the filling and put a sealer round the edges? She cannot afford a commercial repair?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      It's worth a try, Trisha. It may hold up enough for the RV to be used a few times or perhaps it will last longer. :)

      RG

    • Kelly 2 years ago

      I have question... Is it worth replace whole roof, windows, doors and floorings??! I am little freak out because I moved in 1986 Skyline Layton 5th wheel travel trailer. It seem not bad at first but the more longer I live here the more true color my trailer reveals. With my limit income, is it worth to repair so much around here or should I let it go?

      Roof have leaks. We fixed some with tars recent summer but very minor water comes in somewhere inside roof. The roof is very weak to climb on for any reason. Two of windows is leaking some water. And yes, that caused water damaged to the floorings. I also see there's badly damage where it's impossible to tell until it got worsen by spreading out weak floor in my bedroom. That when I knew on one side of trailer from first door, sink, cabinets, closets and to second door (my bedroom) are pretty much damaged but hidden right under them all. I seen some was mentioned remove cabinets and all off floor are big job. Help. =(((

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Kelly,

      I hate to hear of someone getting ripped off in such a manner. Since I cannot inspect the damage you describe, I can only make suggestions to you about your problems.

      Installing anew roof on your RV will run around $3000 or more depending on who installs it. Add to this replacement windows, doors, plus roof rafters damaged by the leaks and floor materials and labor so you're looking $5000+ in repairs if you don't run into other problems.

      You may find another RV for less than $5000 in good shape. You now know what to look for in a used RV. Anything else to ask me?

      Randy

    • Paul Rising 24 months ago

      I've recently purchased a 2012 Cross Roads 32' Slingshot. I'm finding water under the vinyl floor at several locations around the perimeter especially at the front and back where the siding terminates just below the floor structure which appears to be 1/4" plywood on 1 1/2"alum. joists infilled with Styrofoam. The only protection on the bottom of this system at these locations is a black reinforced plastic tarp like material. I suspect this plastic not only allows water to penetrate as it rolls off the siding and hang on these horizontal surfaces but wicks the moisture up into the system as it is wrapped up onto the walls exterior just below the fiberglass siding. When I was a practicing architect I ran into capillary action like this once or twice. Have you run into this condition before and how was it remediated.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 24 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Paul, I haven't run into this problem before, but it may be possible to use a silicone caulk to reseal the area along the bottom of the siding to prevent further damage.

    • Paul Rising 24 months ago

      Thanks for your response Randy. As for sealing the bottom edge of the siding I believe the moisture is wicking between the plastic sheet and an asphalt paper adhered to the bottom of the floor sandwich. This condition occurs from the back of the terminal trim at the back, the aluminum skirt at the front and runs horizontally for about 6" until it hits the main structure that sits below the sandwich floor system.The plastic sheeting runs up the wall under the sheathing that supports the fiberglass siding. It appears I'd have to remove the plastic, provide a terminal flashing with a drip and install a better water barrier like a peel and stick ice & water shield. Thoughts?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 24 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Paul--I apologize for not understanding your problem completely but I cannot picture how an d where the moisture originates. Is it coming from the roof down between the siding and then wicking into the floor area? Sorry for my confusion.

      Randy

    • Alaena 23 months ago

      Hi Randy,

      Thanks so much for your wisdom. As a DIYer with a low budget, it's a tremendous help. We recently purchased as 1985 Shasta travel trailer which has extensive water damage in the rear bedroom which we think is from a faulty fresh water tank connection (hard to be sure in the cold Maine winter). We have torn the sub floor/insulation/rotted floor joists out and have found that the thin aluminum underneath is also extremely rusted with many holes (it's completely disconnected from the wall in the rear). Any suggestions on a way to replace this? I think its beyond repair. I should note that we do not plan to take the camper on the road. Many thanks!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 23 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Alaena, if I understand you correctly, the deteriated metal is beneath the floor and attaches to the rear wall. You may be able to pop rivet a replacement piece of metal over the old piece or in place of it.

      It's a simple matter and not very costly to do so, especially if you buy an inexpensive pop rivet gun and have a drill.

      Feel free to ask for more info if needed. :)

      Randy

    • Edris 23 months ago

      I realized my water was turned off . I turned it on and apparently when I saw water was off left a faucet on. It ran until grey holding tank was full, overflowed at my shower. It's a 5th wheel and bathroom is on top side with bedroom. We grabbed a shop vac and I got grey tank emptied. Some carpet got wet, and started fans right away. What can I check for any damage we can't see . Toy hauler is a new toy hauler . I am sick about possible damage to furnace, etc?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 23 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Edris, you may be lucky you found the problem so quick and started the drying process before any major damage was done. The furnace should be okay when it dries properly but keep an eye on any buckling of the floor in the bath.

      Let me know if there's any apparent damage if you need some more advice.

      Randy

    • rebel 23 months ago

      Hi I have a 1973 or so rv trailer with a pop out on the side I am about to redo floor and walls on should I take out all the floor cabinets and do the floors they are bad from front to back and should I use 3/4 in plywood sanded I am going to 're insulate The floor and use felt under plywood and use vinyl flooring What is ur take on this I build storage shed so I don't know any thing about remodeling project

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 23 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey rebel, whether to remove the cabinets or not depends on how bad the floor beneath them is deteriorated. In the project pictured in this article I left them alone and simply replaced the floor around them, being sure to place extra joists along the base of the cabinets to support the new flooring.

      Using 3/4 plywood sounds good and so does vinyl flooring. Take your time and please ask for more info if you run into any problems. I'd be pleased to advise you. Good luck on your repairs.

      Randy

    • HenryBoss 22 months ago

      Hello Randy,

      I have been reading your blog and I'm very impressed with your knowledge and advice you providing to everybody.

      I got a problem my own and now I need your advice.

      My first purchase of a used TT did not turnout to be a bargain.

      I discovered extensive damage in the floor at the front of the camper.

      The damage involves an area of about seven foot by seven foot. Unfortunately, about have of the six foot slide is in this area.

      The rotten floor has been taken out, but I can not get to the part underneath the extended slide. I'm prepared to take the slide out to get to this part, at the same time I will remove the carpet in the slide portion. (Carpet is wrapped around the front and stapled to the underneath side of the slide floor).

      The subfloor framing is made of 1 1/4 " aluminum tubing. Below that is a rubber membrane. I'm going to use non treated ply wood and Styrofoam

      to fill the space I need to fill.

      Now here comes the question, can I use aluminum L-brackets riveted to the tubing to support the plywood or should I use just wood and screwed to the aluminum as a support for the floor. My thinking is the steel screw in the aluminum will create a problem (corrosion).

      I'm looking forward to your input.

      Thanks.

      Btw, can I insert pictures if needed?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 22 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Henry, and thanks for the question and your time. I believe if you want to use steel screws you can use some anodized screws to prevent any future corrsion or even heavy duty aluminun screws instead. If you have a dropbox account you may place photos there and leave a link here. Thanks for the question and please ask if you need more advice.

      Randy

    • HenryBoss 22 months ago

      Thanks Randy.

      I'm good for now.

      I have to look into a dropbox account for the future.

    • Chris 21 months ago

      I am working on a 2003 class c shasta cheyenne. It has a couple soft spots in floor. My concern is that the floor is put together like the walls and that they are sandwiched together, with the airsucked out, am i wrong are the floors not put together like this?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 21 months ago from Southern Georgia

      I'm sorry Chris, but I'm not familiar with your RV's construction at all. You won't know until you tear up a section of the floor and see for yourself. When you find out I'll be happy to advise you on the repairs.

      Randy

    • Chris 21 months ago

      Ok i got the carpet / linoleum pulled up and the bad spots cut out. Underneath has metal joist so i am going to weld in extra. My question now is do i need to worry about new floor thickness? Wife wants pergo and it is 4 times the thickness of the linoleum .060 to .275. I see there is 3 rollers under the slide and being unable to get new floor under the rollers is going to have to jump up on new floor? Thanks so much for your help

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 21 months ago from Southern Georgia

      I would think the floor thickness would have to be the same as the original in order for the slide-out to work properly, Chris. However, there may be enough clearance for the Pergo to be utilized.

      You'll have to make the call on this one, Chris. Perhaps you can do a small section to see if the clearance really makes a difference?

    • Jacquie 21 months ago

      If a trailer has a metal frame around the outside edge and we are doing a (hopefully) small floor repair in the middle, are we crossing our fingers that the joists under the rotten floor are still good so that we can attach the new floor to it? If they're not is there an easy solution or do we have to rip up the wall and floors from side to side of the trailer and replace the joists? The section requiring a repair is under the bathtub and part of the bathroom which is located at the very back of the trailer. It's a 1992 Nomad. Beside the bathroom is a bunkbed which contains the water holds. Thank you for all the time you've spent on this site!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 21 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Jacquie, all trailers are not made using the same construction techniques so it's difficult to know what sort of joists you'll find beneath the floor. You'll just have to bite the bullet and tear out a section of the bad flooring material to see for sure. You'll have to do this anyway and I'm fairly sure the repairs won't be too difficult to handle if you possess basic skills with hand tools. I'll be glad to assist you if you need some advice. :)

      Randy

    • Randy 21 months ago

      Soft spots have shown up in heavy traffic area

      Can I just floor over completely with thin plywood liquid nail down,

      Cover with tiles and glue down.

      If so how thick does the plywood or other have to be.

      Recommendations

    • Lori 20 months ago

      Hi Randy,

      My question is not exactly how to replace a floor but we are looking at buying a used 2008 Rockwood Roo 23ss Hybrid. One owner kept really clean and inside all winter but when we walk on the floor all of it is spongy feeling. They said it has always been. The trailer still smells brand new could they be telling the truth that the floor was always that way? We figured if it was rotten we would smell it. It was all shut up and they opened it for us to see and it was not stinky.?? Thanks.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 20 months ago from Southern Georgia

      @Randy-If you choose to simply add a layer of plywood, then the thicker the better. However, I recommend using screws as well as adhesive to firmly attach the plywood to the old floor.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 20 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Lori-I've never encountered a "spongy" floor that wasn't damaged in some manner. That's just me though. I'd recommend having someone with construction experience have a look at it before you buy it.

      Randy

    • firefox3021 20 months ago

      I have a 2004 Rockwood Roo 232 with a small slide out. Do I need to remove the slide out even though I'm not replacing the floor on it? The floor on the slide out is solid, I just need to replace the water damaged flooring in the main part of the trailer from the front to about half the length of the trailer and the entire width (about 8ft excluding the slide out). I've never posted a comment before, so I don't know if I'll be able to retrieve it. Please e-mail me firefox3021@gmail.com

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 20 months ago from Southern Georgia

      @firefox--Removing the slide-out is not necessary if you can replace the floor beneath it without removing it. Otherwise, there's no alternative.

      RG

    • DaveB 20 months ago

      I have a R-Vision 2002 trail-lite B21 hybrid TT (the ends pop out like a pop-up). We are the only owners and it has served its purpose and our family well. That said we started to notice "soft spots" in the floor last year and mistakenly figured it was just age and a sheet of plywood over the top would fix the 3ft area under the table. This spring the soft spots spread to the entire front of the camper - the enterance door, in front of the sink and down the hall now joined under the table as sagging and soft.

      A little research brought me to the conclusion I needed to replace large sections of flooring. More research and videos showed me I can handle the project but it will not be easy.

      I removed as much frame/cabinets as possible and noticed a good clue as to where to find rotted wood - if the screws were completely rusted off or heavily corroded then the floor was probably not good in that spot! Looking over the open space I still don't know where the water came from. The water tank and hot water heater were removed with no evidence on the surface of leakage. With the front seats removed I can see the front wall panel of the camper has some rot at the bottom but it looks more like it was from contact with the floor than from water coming down. Maybe during demo I will find more clues.

      Started the first phase (there will be 3 due to size) of demo and after peeling back the vinyl I was shocked how wet and rotted the particle board was. This floor section is constructed (bottom to top) steel frame, barrier plastic, 1/4" particle board glued to 2" foam glued to 1/4" particle board, vinyl surface. There was literally no where for moisture to go but to spread out! Anything I do HAS to be better than this! My debate is to use treated plywood or epoxy sealed plywood over felt for the top layer. Thought or concerns?

      Thank you for this invaluable resource!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 20 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Dave, particle board is notorious for becoming soft over the years especially if one lives in a damp or humid climate. As in the above camper the moisture has nowhere to go and eventually breaks down from the pressure of being tread upon.

      This is the main reason we used treated plywood to prevent this from happening again. You'll have to decide the best replacement material to use depending on where you will have the camper stored. Good luck on your repairs and feel free to ask for more info if needed. :)

      Randy

    • DaveB 20 months ago

      Thanks again Randy,

      The camper is used and stored in Wisconsin so hot humid summers and Frozen Tundra in winter. I was thinking about using vinyl tile but after reading here about the concerns about adhesion in cold climates I am rethinking this option. The camper will never be used or moved in the extreme cold and I really don't want to do battle with a roll of vinyl so if you hear anything about adhesive backed vinyl tile success in extremes please let your readers know.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 20 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Since I live in the deep south I cannot vouch for vinyl tile's longevity in colder climates, Dave. We did use a glue activator on the tile in this article's project and it was very difficult to remove some mishapen tiles during the installation. We had to remove them a few little pieces at a time because the glue worked so well. I highly recommend using a glue activator with vinyl adhesive tile.

      Randy

    • BonesDC 19 months ago

      Randy,

      I purchased my first camper with no knowledge of possible problems to watch out for. Needless to say I purchased an RV off craigslist from a seller that claimed the discolored linoleum was from his daughter spilling water on the floor. The floor was fine for the first year but then started to sag and is very bad now. After reading as much as possible from this sight and others Ive discovered my 2001 Aerolite Cub has a sandwiched floor with no support structure other than the trailer frame. I am beyond perplexed as to why they would construct a floor this way and how it could even remotely be safe. My plans to replace are to have a friend fabricate either aluminum or galvanized framing to attach to the trailer and then use a product called Nylosheet as my plywood. This product although expensive will not rot and is not affected by moisture in any way. It is made from nylon carpet fiber and some fiberglass. It should make for an amazing replacement that will never cause issues. My question is, since it is so expensive how do i work around the thickness issue of the previous sandwiched material and should I add some kind of Styrofoam for insulation.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 19 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Bones, as you found out the hard way, there's more to buying a used RV of any kind than simply looking at it. And also the veracity of some sellers is supect when they're trying to make a sale. Too bad for the buyer in most cases.

      It should be illegal for makers of RVs to use some of the materials they do because just a small amount of moisture will start the flooring to degrade and eventually disintegrate when walked on very much,

      I'll have to take a look at the Nylosheet as it sounds like has the potential for a great replacement flooring. As for getting the correct thickness, you can either have the new frame constructed at the correct height which will eliminate the problem or either use a layer of pressure treated plywood to achieve the same results.

      I'd like to see the completed project when you're finished with it, of course. Feel free to ask for more info if you require it, and thanks for the question. :)

      Randy.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 19 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Sorry Bones, I neglected to address the insulation issue. Yes, styrofoam is the perfect insulation for this project as it will not degrade or compact as other insulating materials can. Any insulation is better than none in these situations. :)

      Randy

    • Rudi D 19 months ago

      I have a 1998 Dutchmen Lite travel trailer. The front 6 feet of the floor is shot. I see how to repair it. The question I have is about the what I would call the sill plate. It is also shot from the fender wells to each front corner and across the front side. This board is wrapped with under cover and linoleum between it and the bottom plate on walls.How can we get a new board in under the walls. Apparently we need somehow jack up the walls to get this board in place. Did the floor originally go between these 2 boards?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 19 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Rudi, yes the floor is put down before the walls are added. Fortunately for this floor repair project, the material beneath the walls was still in good shape.

      And yes, you will have to jack up the walls a bit at a time to get the new material beneath them. Just be sure you use plenty of L brackets to reattach the walls to the new floor.

      Randy

    • Jeff Fildes 19 months ago

      I have a 1999 sprinter by keystone with a soft floor, how do I know how thick of plywood to repair it

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 19 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Well Jeff, you can only determine the correct thickness by removing a section of the floor which you'll have to anyway. If you're only replacing a bad section of the floor then be sure to measure an undamaged piece of the floor to use as a guide to what thickness to use.

      Randy

    • Charmaine 19 months ago

      We have a Montana High Country fifth wheel (2012). In the pass through area the floor directly in front of each door is soft. What would be the process in replacing the floor.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 19 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Charmaine, I don't know what the floor in your camper is composed of, so I cannot advise you on the repairs. You'll have to tear up the damaged spots to see how the floor is supported and what material was used in the construction of your RV. I'll be glad to assist you when you have a look-see.

      Randy

    • Matt 18 months ago

      I have a 2006 aerolite the rear p/s wood is rotten which allowed my fram to pull from the wood do i have to cut out the floor from the top to replace the wood underneath also i have read that aeolite camper frams have hardley any support under there how do i get started on repairing this please help

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 18 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Matt, some campers have the walls attached to the floor after the floor is installed. If the floor is bad the walls tend to come loose from the floor and any repairs to the floor requires using steel brackets to assure the walls are firmly reattached to the floor. Good luck with your repairs. :)

      Randy

    • Zingy 17 months ago

      Hi Randy, first thank you so much for all the helpful advice I have found here! We have a 2010 travel trailer with mystery water leaks in a few places. We have removed a lot of floor in the front and back of the trailer. We have removed some of the damaged floor from under the walls and are bracing those sections. We plan to put in peel and stick vinyl planks, and will go with your adhesive recommendation. We are replacing the removed floor with plywood and possibly styrofoam insulation. My question is given part of the floor will be new plywood and part will be the remaining undamaged particle board/OSB, do we need to go the extra step and put some thin luaun over it all to create a smooth surface for the vinyl planks, or is it okay to just put them over the new and old surfaces? Thanks!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 17 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Zingy, I really have no experience with installing vinyl tile over OSB, but I believe if you use an adhesive activator it should be okay. You might try a spot to see how well the tile adheres to the surface. Smooth particleboard will be no problem though.

      Randy

    • J. D. Williams 17 months ago

      Recently purchased a 2004 24' Zepplin by Keystone and I guess we were fooled by the cleanliness and the fact that everything worked. As we began doing more cleanup we found a lot of soft spots in the floor mainly around the toilet and front door. We went on line and read your advice about repairing the floor. Feeling about the fact you said it can be done by a DIYer we proceeded to remove the vinyl and then the plywood which only 1/4" thick and appeared wet and originally was glued to the star-form and aluminum cross beams. No wood joist. running front to back. Would it be better to replace the thin plywood and glue it back to the foam or take some other approach. Our plans are to have some type of prefinished wood floor as the finished surface. Please make any suggestions as to the repair and finished flooring.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 17 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello J.D., Since I cannot see what sort of support you have beneath the floor I hesitate to advise you how to go about replacing the plywood. However, if the plywood is strong when replaced and you add another layer of the prefinished wood floor it should be strong enough. If I misunderstood your question, please feel free to contact me anytime and I'll try to assist you with the repairs. :)

      Randy

    • J.D 17 months ago

      Randy, I am not sure what is underneath the the form and aluminum crossbeams but i can assume it is another thin layer of thin plywood that formed some sort of laminated assembly for strength. Do you think I can apply replacement layer of thin plywood using liquid nail to adhere to the form and the aluminum beams and then add the top finish wood floor? Is there a way to send you a photo of my flooring problem?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 17 months ago from Southern Georgia

      JD, I assume your RV uses a layer of Styrofoam sandwiched between two pieces of plywood as in the camper I show on this article. It seems to be a common material used in many campers of the past. I don't know how you would be able to check the bottom layer of plywood to see if it is still in good shape without removing a piece and seeing for yourself. If it is still in fair shape you may simply add the top layer of plywood using a good adhesive such as Liquid Nail as you suggested. with the new layer of flooring placed atop the laminated foam it should be even stronger than the original flooring.

      Randy

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 17 months ago from Southern Georgia

      JD, You can send me an email by going to my profile page and clicking on fan mail to get in touch with me. :)

    • Jon Woods profile image

      Jon Woods 17 months ago

      We have an 04 weekend warrior toyhauler with a front bedroom. in the under bedroom storage compartment there is a soft spot in the front passenger side corner. it measures about 2 ft square. also the access door frame screws into this soft spot. there is linoleum on top of the wood with a joining strip so I don't need to cut the linoleum to make the repair.it seems to me that the entire bottom of the access panel door is attatched to rotten wood. the soft spot goes from midway in the opening forward. it contacts both the front wall and side wall. is there a way to reframe the access door mount? also how would I attatch the replacement joists to the exterior wall? This is a fiberglass walled unit.

      I noticed the interior paneling is rotten as well but im not concerned with the cosmetic appearance when I replace that. we know the source of the water damage was a roof leak that has since been repaired ( I hope ) at a dealer. I noticed you talk about not going to deep to puncture the trailer floor... I see a black plastic bag material under the whone trailer that feels as though it contains insulation. its almost like tyvex house wrap? if I puncture that is there a good way to reseal it?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 17 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Jon, I've used construction adhesives--such as Liquid Nail--to attach wood to fiberglass before and it seemed to work well. as far as the insulation is concerned, any good repair tape--such as duct tape--should work to reseal the covering as long as it stays dry.

      Randy

    • Jon Woods profile image

      Jon Woods 17 months ago

      thank you! I hadn't thought of using const. adhesives. that will work perfect on the walls. good to know I was over thinking the resealing of the covering. any tips of reframing that access door frame?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 17 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Jon, what did the access door attach to originally? Can you also use adhesives to reframe it?

    • Ivan 14 months ago

      I have my eyes on a 1998 32 Ft Gulfstream Travel Trailer, but the condition is listed as salvage for parts and it also has a bad roof. I'm worried about water damage with the bad roof. My question is... Can it be saved, or is it a lost cause?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 14 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Ivan, take in consideration that a bad rubber roof will cost $3000+ to replace at the very start. And I suspect the flooring is damaged also. Depends on how much money and time you have. :)

    • Renae Roberts from TX 12 months ago

      We have a 96 class C RV that has some really dirty carpet in all but the bathroom area. I would like to replace the whole floor with stick down tiles, as has been recommended. We have DIY tools & ability to get this done , especially with the good info here. However, my husband wonders if the carpet is insulating us from a lot of road noise & if we will really notice that? Also, should we leave the carpet in the front driver/passenger area? Thank you for any advice.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 12 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Renae, I don't think the road noise will be much louder with the tile in place as there should be insulation beneath the floor which will deaden any sound the removal of the carpet may cause. If the carpet in the driver area is in good shape I would leave it in place. Ask for more info if you need it and thanks for reading. :)

      Randy

    • Renae Roberts 11 months ago

      Thank You!

    • JR Grissom 9 months ago

      Randy,First of all thank you for sharing this info,I'm getting ready to restore a 1972 Indian Winnebago.I've got it gutted atm.would a floating floor work.also my roof leaks.I'm thinking instead of going back with metal,I'm going with TPO,It's lighter and if applied right will withstand winds of up to 300+ mph.(if i get a leak I can just weld a patch on it.lol,ima roofer so that's not a problem)Any suggestions on how to keep the weight distributed out.Suggestions on the walls,I'm considering knotty pine.Any Nput whatsoever would be greatly appreciated I wanted to do Oak but that would be to heavy wouldn't it...again thanks and any and all nput would definitely be appreciated.again thank you for this site...

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 9 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey JR, and thanks for visiting. I've heard of some using a floating floor with good results, so I see no problem with this aspect of your plans for the Indian. As I'm not familiar with what sort of roof supports this particular model utilized I hesitate to advise you on the weight distribution for this project. You'll simply have to wing it and as a roofer should be able to figure it out. LOL!

      As for the walls, yes weight is always a consideration for a moving object, but the difference in types of wood--depending on the thickness of course--may be negligible. With any RV restoration project, the fun is in the experiments. :)

      Feel free to ask for any advice you deem necessary JR, and I'd like to see some photos of the rebuild. Thanks for the questions and your time.

      Randy

    • Cory 8 months ago

      I to am in the process of repair of a 2004 Aerolite trailer floor.

      I am wondering do I add the "L' brackets to the new joists and to the the aluminum wall joists? Or do I add the brackets to the new 3/4" plywood I will be placing on the new joists and then to the walls. One side of the floor has plastic conduits up against the wall, so there is nothing solid to attach to. I had the idea of adding brackets on this side to connect the bottom wall frame(which is 2" above on this side) to the new joists. Any help would be great!!

    • Cory 8 months ago

      This trailer, 2004 Aerolite, has the floor construction which I have seen mentioned by others that is plastic membrane underneath, sandwich of thin plywood and styrofoam, only supports seem to be trailer rails 1' in from walls running lengthwise, and a 2 cross beams (width of trailer) one towards middle, and one under fridge cabinet and closet/furnace/power box (same beam running under fridge cabinet). So now trying to figure the best way to configure and fasten the new joists. I am building the new floor frame from where floor starts under bed area, all the way back to kitchen cabinets along the back wall. This is pretty much all of the floor area inside the trailer, except for under cabinets that cannot be removed. thanks in advance for any insights you can give me.

    • Randy Godwin 8 months ago

      Hi Cory, you have to wing it as far as adding new joists and brackets to the floor and wall are concerned. I fastened the brackets to the new floor surface--in this case it was to the one inch treated plywood I used as replacement for the previous floor. We also added extra joists to support the new floor better than it was previously.

      The brackets are a necessity in order to anchor the walls to the floor so do the best you can to do this securely. Feel free to ask for more info if needed.

      Randy

    • Cory 8 months ago

      Thanks so much for your quick reply!! This job has turned out to be way more work and thought than anticipated! I was actually concerned about the walls as they appear to be sagging slightly. I have used floor jacks on the outside to secure the wall before I go on to add joists, it just seemed like a good thing to do. Thanks again and keep up the good work.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 8 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Pleased o assist you, Cory. Let me know if you need more advice. :)

    • Cory 8 months ago

      I was wondering what you used to secure the walls to the floor. Did you connect brackets to the wall studs and to the 3/4" plywood? Thanks again for your help.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 8 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Yes Cory, I attached the brackets to the new floor before screwing them to the walls. This will prevent the walls from coming loose from the trailer floor. Feel free to ask for more help as always. :)

    • Wayne 8 months ago

      Floor is weak against far wall from door, it has a couch on the back wall, how do u suggest to replace floor

    • Randy Godwin 8 months ago

      Wayne, you have to remove a small section of the damaged floor to see how it is constructed. Every RV seems to be a bit different as to the construction of flooring.

    • Kristin 7 months ago

      Hi Randy- thank you for this great information. We are new to campers/trailers. Here are two questions- how can I estimate the cost to replace flooring for a 23 foot trailer (current two sections seem to be soft with past water damage so a good portion of floor likely to be replaced. How long would it take to remove flooring, add subfloor,etc. If repair to a trailer has been done but past floor damage in spots would you even consider buying a used, discounted trailer (no other signs of any damage or water damage). Any things to consider or look for? Thank you

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 7 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Kristin, it's really hard to give you reliable advice without personally examining your camper. One needs to do their homework as far as figuring material and labor costs before attempting floor repairs. Tearing out a small portion of the damaged flooring is the only way to see what is required for the repairs as each camper is somewhat different than other models.

      Be sure to check out any used camper or RV for both floor and roof repairs before you make a purchase as these are the two most expensive parts to repair. Thanks for the question. :)

      Randy

    • Janice Henning 7 months ago

      Hi, what about asbestos in the flo0ring? I just purchased a 1979 Serro Scotty with two layers of linoleum and needs to be pulled up. There is a soft spot in the center of the floor.

    • Randy Godwin 7 months ago

      Hi Janice, I've never encountered asbestos in any flooring job. Repairing the floor in a Serro Scotty shouldn't be a big job because of its size.

      Randy

    • Bev 7 months ago

      Hi Randy - I have a mobile home that has jut outs and I want to replace the carpeting with vinyl tiles. The cut out has carpet and is laid on top of the jut out to allow it to go in and out if it needs to be moved. When I lifted it up there is a rod - I assume to allow the movement - so if I law vinyl it will be higher than the lino floor in the kitchen part. How do I lay the vinyl to allow the jut out to move should I decide to sell it and have to pull it in for moving. No one I know has a solution so hoping you can help me - thanks - Bev

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 7 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Bev, is the problem that you can't find any tile thinner than the carpet you removed from the slide-out? Am I understanding your problem correctly?

      Randy

    • Bev 7 months ago

      The carpet is above the lino so the slideout can move in easy without wrecking the lino. I have 6 wee grandchildren and the carpet in the kitchen is disgusting and I want to get it out and replace with vinyl but I still need to be able to move the slideout if I ever sell it. The carpet is put in in two pieces. The first piece is on top of the slide out with a slight hangover so when they put the second piece of carpet in it lays underneath the first one. If you lift the carpet up there is a piece of plywood and then some sort of plastic tube that is slightly raised - I am guessing that is what pulls the slide out over and in to the trailor for transport. It is not an RV trailor and is parked at a recreation lot at Glennifer lake in Alberta. It is not likely we will move it but should something happen my kids might want to sell it and it would have to be moved. I can lay the vinyl and a seem and just unsnap it as it is a snap in vinyl but the pull out area is about 1/4 of an inch higher when you get to the pullout plastic thing - sorry but I don't really know what it is called - hope this makes sense - Bev

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 7 months ago from Southern Georgia

      I really don't know what to tell you without seeing it for myself, Bev. I'd simply go ahead with the tile and let the kids worry about it. Sorry I can't be of more use to you than this.

      Randy

    • Janice Henning 6 months ago

      What about asbestos? I had my 1979 flooring tested (did myself) and there are two layers of linoleum. The backing of the top layer is 50% Cyrstaline asbestos. So now, I don't know what to do. There is a soft spot but I don't have the funds to do an asbestos floor removal. And what about the loose linoleum that has asbestos backing that is lying loose under the bedding?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Janice, I'm sorry but I cannot advise you on asbestos related products used in your camper. I do not have the expertise required to help you in this matter. Sorry!

      Randy

    • Dan 5 months ago

      Looking at completely lifting a 2001 r-vision B17 hybrid body off.

      Ever seen or dealt with the aluminum frame / construction of these?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 5 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Dan, I'm not familiar with that model so I cannot advise you on the construction methods used. I'd be interested in seeing some photos of it if you have the time.

      Randy

    • Michael 5 months ago

      Recently purchased my first used trailer (24') and I have found that the floor is soft along the wall under the stove and sink area. (approx. 10' x 1') The good news seems to be that it is an area where there is no foot traffic. The bad news seems to be that replacing it will be complicated and more expensive because of the location. If I can determine that the cause of the leak has been fixed, will I be able to live with the damage or is it just going to get worse?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Michael, if the leak is stopped I'd simply keep an eye on the area in question and wait and see for now. It may be okay to leave it since it's in a place where foot traffic won't further degrade the area. Sometimes it's simply easier to let things be for awhile.

      Randy

    • Pat 5 months ago

      Hi Randy, I have a 07' Aerolite cub 160 that I have kept dry for 3 years but the floor was wet in several areas when I purchased(i presumed from lack of maintenance and from sitting outside). I already had to repair floor(from underneath) where folding step was partially supported from styrofoam floor(bad design). I accomplished this by replacing luan and panning that corner of floor with aluminum and added a little square stock(like factory) to support entry step which the factory should have done. But hears my question: The floor is getting soft now further in and got the dreaded purple spot in vinyl and not sure how to attack this from the top(inside camper). Do i remove all rotten luan and styrofoam up to cabinets and walls then add wood joists between frame rails or what? Do you think theres a way to just add said joists(or plywood) between frame rails from underneath and leave styrofoam in place. Then remove the vinyl and replace any loose luan and then put down new floor covering. I guess all this is dependent upon how much damage is there and accessability to supporting from underneath. I cant really see how they support the floor other than 4 pieces of angle iron attached to frame at each corner(really?) or do the tanks hide more?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Pat, if you can replace the bad flooring from the topside then I'd suggest you do so. As you can see in this article, we added more floor joists than was originally used in the floor construction. In my experience, these Styrofoam and luan floors will eventually degrade over the years so it's better to use a more reliable flooring material during repairs.

      If the flooring underneath the cabinets is solid I would merely replace the damaged areas up to them. Ask for more info if needed.

      Randy

    • Carol 4 months ago

      We have an o4 Jay Feather Exp. The floor at the front of the camper is rotted. We have taken much of the old composite floor out (where it was rotten on both sides of the flooring) down to the outer membrane. As you are aware, these trailers have no joists to lay a new floor on. Not sure how you added your extra floor joists. You mentioned clamps but not sure where you put them. We can add a joist running across the floor over the metal under the trailler that runs the length of the trailer but how do we attach from front to back. There is a joist in the front of the trailer and one about 3/4 of the way down. We are thinking about having a welder add extra beam across the trailer so the joists we add from front to back have some support under them. So confusing for novists.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hey Carol, yes I'm aware that some campers have very few floor joists to support the floor. Welding extra beams to support the floor would be great if you cannot add joists any other way. Any way you can add extra supports to the floor will be fine.

      Randy

    • Carol 4 months ago

      Can you explain to me how you attached your floor to the walls. Talking to an rv guy and he said we would have to get the new floor under the walls of the camper. Seems like an impossible task.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 4 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Carol, we didn't go under the walls but used plenty of L-shaped steel brackets to attach the walls to the new floor. We added floor supports around the edge of the walls for the new floor to attach to. The bottom of the brackets are screwed to the floor while upper part of the bracket attached to the wall. Hope this helps!

      Randy

    • Carol 3 months ago

      How would you do this over a Darco membrane?

    • Brenda Hawkins 8 weeks ago

      What can I do to figure out how much damage and the amount of flooring I will have to replace?

    • Randy Godwin 8 weeks ago

      Brenda, you may have to drill some holes into the bad places in the floor to determine what wood needs to be replaced and what thickness the replacement flooring needs to be. Then you can figure the materials needed for the repairs. Feel free to ask for more info if needed.

      Randy

    • Vanessa 7 weeks ago

      About how much would that cost to do on a 22 foot trailer?

    • BGE 7 weeks ago

      Hey Randy. Great site. I purchased a 1990 32' Skyline Weekender. Leaks have been stopped, but the upright support in the front driver's side corner is nothing but powder. It's bad enough that the corner has dropped down an inch or so and caused the plywood in that area of the wall to roll down with it. This has been replaced before because the plywood is new with screws in it. Basically, it seems that corner of the trailer is resting solely on the plywood floor and bending it. The question is this better approached from the outside corner or inside? How do I jack up the corner without bending the outside tin panels? FYI, there is a wall-to-wall built in bench couch in the front. Thanks in advance

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 weeks ago from Southern Georgia

      BGE--It may be easier to work from the inside rather than having to remove the exterior metal panels. Is there any way to place a wooden support in the corner? If so, you may be able to jack up the corner enough to replace the support. Have you considered using thicker plywood to support the corner?

      Feel free to ask for more info if I'm not understanding the problem correctly.

      Randy

    • Gerald johannes 3 days ago

      I've read alot about wood floor replacement, i want to know, does the new floor go under the outer wall? Alot of comments express the guy goes up to the outer wall. No one talks about going under the iuter wall, when u build a house, the wall sits on the floor, which should b the right way i have a 30'0 camper, I'm changing the whole floor, I'm going to jack up the outside wall, n slip the new wood under the wall, i don't care what anybody says, that's the right way to do it

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 days ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Gerald, yes it is much better to replace the floor under the walls if possible. If the new floor only goes to the wall instead of under it then L shaped steel brackets are required to attach the walls securely to the floor for added strength.

      Randy

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