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How To Rebuild Or Repair Case 580 Tractor Backhoe Hydraulic Cylinders

Updated on April 30, 2016
Randy Godwin profile image

Randy has years of experience dealing with all sorts of hydraulic repairs around the farm and on many types of industrial equipment.

Source

Backhoe Hydraulic Cylinder Rebuilding

A tractor backhoe or front end loader is one of the handiest pieces of equipment used on the farm or on a construction site. These fine machines use a variety of hydraulic cylinders for lifting, digging, moving earth, digging ditches, and many other construction uses.

Occasionally these hydraulic cylinders need to be rebuilt because of leaking seals around the piston rod. Having a repair shop do this for you can run into quite a bit of money and also cause a long wait while the hydraulic cylinders are being rebuilt for you.

This article is intended to help you rebuild and repair the backhoe hydraulic cylinders on your particular machine. Even if you are not experienced in this type of hydraulic repair, this article will guide you through the steps needed to rebuild the backhoe hydraulic cylinders yourself.

Hydraulic Cylinder Rebuild Kits

580C Case backhoe being repaired
580C Case backhoe being repaired | Source
Hydraulic cylinder rebuild kit for this backhoe stabilizing jack
Hydraulic cylinder rebuild kit for this backhoe stabilizing jack | Source
Includes seals and basic instructions
Includes seals and basic instructions | Source

How To Obtain The Correct Hydraulic Cylinder Rebuild Kit

Finding the correct hydraulic cylinder building kit is the first step in the rebuilding process. Some backhoes and front end loaders may use several different makes of hydraulic cylinders to perform the same function on your particular machine.

The Case 580C backhoe being repaired in this article is a prime example of such an instance and is therefore a perfect example for explaining the hydraulic cylinder rebuild process.

The Case 580C backhoe stabilizing jack being repaired listed two different rebuild kits for the hydraulic cylinder used to work the jacks. One has a one piece piston while the other used a two piece piston. It is very important to get the right hydraulic cylinder rebuild kit before starting the repair job. Once you disassemble the hydraulic cylinder you do not want to wait for the correct kit to arrive.

The correct part number is usually stamped into the gland of the hydraulic cylinder. Getting the correct rebuild kit should pose no problem if this part number can be found intact and readable. Even if you can only read some of the numbers the right rebuild kit can usually be found. You may find this kit online or through a tractor dealership.

Making The Gland Removal Tool

Measure the gland holes and piston rod diameter
Measure the gland holes and piston rod diameter | Source
Completed gland tool
Completed gland tool | Source
Loosen hydraulic lines before gland removal
Loosen hydraulic lines before gland removal | Source
Using the gland tool for removing the gland
Using the gland tool for removing the gland | Source

Gland Removal Tools

Safety is an important factor in rebuilding hydraulic cylinders so be careful and do not hurry the job. Always take time to study the parts you remove if you don't have a schematic of the parts.

Take a photo if possible before each step to avoid confusion during the reassembly process.

After removing the yoke from the stabilizing jack stand by pulling the retaining pins, drop the jack to the ground and place a board or some other non metal object beneath the cylinder to keep it steady and to prevent dirt from getting on the parts.

It is important to not scratch the piston rod or other parts of the assembly. A marred piston rod will cause the new seals to wear quickly.

The gland on this particular hydraulic cylinder uses a common four hole system for removing and replacing the gland in the cylinder itself.

You may purchase a tool made just for this job, and there are a couple on this page, but since I have the tools and metal I prefer to make my own.

Each hydraulic cylinder, or tandem cylinders may use a different size gland removal tool which runs into quite a bit of money if you buy them.

By making your own you will eventually have a complete set. I make my gland removal tools from old plow points, case hardened bolts which fit the holes, and a piece of sturdy pipe.

An acetylene torch and arc welder is used to shape the tool and weld in the prongs made from the bolts.

Before attempting to remove the gland, loosen the hydraulic lines to allow fluid pressure to release and prevent a vacuum, making removal of the piston more difficult.

Removing piston and gland from piston rod

Gland unscrewed and fluid drained from cylinder
Gland unscrewed and fluid drained from cylinder
Retaining bolt or nut
Retaining bolt or nut
Gland and piston rod
Gland and piston rod
One piece piston.  Some hydraulic cylinders have two piece pistons
One piece piston. Some hydraulic cylinders have two piece pistons

Disassembly of Piston And Gland

After completion of the gland removal tool, it is a simple matter of unscrewing the gland from the cylinder and removing the piston rod from the cylinder itself. Extending the hydraulic cylinder to its full length before removing the gland will save you the trouble of having to pull the piston rod very far to remove it. Use a sturdy point to attach the piston rod yoke to in order to unscrew the retaining bolt from the piston rod.

I normally use the original yoke connection if possible. Since a thread locking substance is used to keep the retaining bolt from vibrating loose (a very dangerous occurrence) it may be necessary to heat the end of the retaining bolt before you can get it to break free from the threads. Keep the torch flame away from the piston itself and concentrate it on the center of the bolt.

With the retaining bolt removed the piston and gland should separate from the piston rod easily. Place these pieces on a clean surface at a comfortable working height and check the seals from the hydraulic cylinder rebuild kit to ensure they are the correct size. It may be helpful to take digital photos as you go to ensure the correct replacement of the new seals.

Gland Removal tools

OTC (1266) Adjustable Gland Nut Wrench
OTC (1266) Adjustable Gland Nut Wrench

For easy removal of Hydraulic cylinder Glands.

 

Removing and Installing the Seals

Close-up of old damaged seal
Close-up of old damaged seal
Replacing gland piston seal
Replacing gland piston seal
Using old seal to properly seat new seal
Using old seal to properly seat new seal
Completed gland with new seals installed
Completed gland with new seals installed
Piston with new seals installed
Piston with new seals installed
Piston rod assembly ready for installation
Piston rod assembly ready for installation

Installing The New Rebuild Kit

After removing the old seals be sure to clean the piston and gland as best you can before installing the new seals. Any grit or sand may damage the new seals. Be careful not to break the rubber or cellulose seals during reassembly. The old piston seal which installs in the gland end ny be inserted by using the old seal to drive it in. In this hydraulic cylinder the retaining bolt washer was the correct size for the purpose and worked well.

Do not be troubled if there are extra seals which appear to have no place in either the piston or gland. The same kit may be used for several models of hydraulic cylinder and extra parts are often included. Once this part of the process is completed you may reassemble the piston and gland on the piston rod in preparation for the retaining bolt. Clean the threads in the cylinder and lightly grease the piston and gland seals.

Clean the retaining bolt threads and the threads inside of the piston rod and then apply a thread locking substance to the threads. Torque the retaining bolt very tightly and insert the piston rod assembly into the cylinder. It may be necessary to tap the gland against the threads in order for the tool to begin engaging the threads. Tighten securely using a lever to ensure the gland is securely attached.

Completing The Hydraulic Cylinder Rebuild

Insert the pins in the jack stand and retighten the hydraulic lines. Be sure to attach all retaining clips securely. Operate the cylinder until the air is removed and the hydraulic cylinder is working smoothly. Check for leaks and the job is done. This same technique is used for almost all types of hydraulic cylinders.

I hope my article helps you with your hydraulic cylinder rebuilding process. Please feel free to ask any questions you may have in the comment section at the bottom of the page. Good luck on your repairs and thanks for reading my article.

Finishing and testing

Tighten hydraulic line connections
Tighten hydraulic line connections
Replace jack stand pins
Replace jack stand pins

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    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 weeks ago from Southern Georgia

      William, this may be a problem in the control valve. It may not be allowing the fluids to equalize properly.

      Randy

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      william 2 weeks ago

      Have a boom cylinder on 555 Ford backhoe. Piston will return all but last half inch, and will not hold up without pressure on control lever...any ideas on my problem!? Thanks in advance.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 7 weeks ago from Southern Georgia

      Joyce, you can have the cylinder reamed out if there's a lot of wear on the inside. I seldom use sandpaper during a cylinder rebuild.

      Randy

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      Joyce Harris 7 weeks ago

      If needed, What grit size sandpaper is best for using when rebuilding a hydraulic cylinder on John Deere backhoe?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 8 weeks ago from Southern Georgia

      Sorry Tom, can't help you with this repair job.

      Randy

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 10 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Gerry, what do you mean by "bottomed out?"

      Randy

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      Gerry 10 months ago

      Hi, the stick cylinder on my 580 Case has bottomed out, can I get the cylinder moving again without taking it apart?, and will there be any damage?, thank you.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 15 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Bill, sometimes if the cylinder's piston rod is extended to it's full length it makes it difficult to turn the gland. I recently ran into the same problem and had to carry the cylinder to a nearby shop to have the gland removed. It was rusted because it had been out in the weather and not used in a long time. Hope this info helps.

      Randy

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      Bill 15 months ago

      Have a 580 k hoe. Trying to get the gland nut off of dipper cylinder Made a tool & even with a long bar it will not budge !

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 24 months ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Antoni, replacing a clutch is not my specialty. Sorry! :(

      Randy

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      Antoni 24 months ago

      My clutch just all of a sudden went out how do i replace that. I have no idea where to start its a case 580 super l 4x4 series 1machine

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      I assume you've checked the transmission fluid level, David? It doesn't take much oil to top the fluid up, but mine will just stop pulling when the transmission fluid gets a little low.

      At first I mistakenly though everything--including the transmission--was powered by the hydraulic pump until the machine stopped moving. I then found the trans dipstick and found out differently. I don't know where the trans filter is located, if it has one.

      Randy

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      David Driscoll 2 years ago

      I have a 580 case. seems all parts move except the machine itself.

      is there a frozen filter or something.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      More than likely it is a sticking valve, Eva. You may try bleeding the brake system before you do any major repairs. :)

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      Eva 2 years ago

      I have a case backhoe when I put brake on to stop it the brake won't release after removei g my foot from petal what can it be

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Michael, and sorry for taking so long to respond to your question. Xmas shopping and all that! LOL! Surely the gland can be removed from the rod in some manner or other. Both glands should slide over the piston rod or perhaps I'm not understanding the problem at all. Can you clarify the problem or maybe send me an email with a photo at randygodwin@planttel .net

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      Michael Amaral 2 years ago

      I have an old Case 320 backhoe, circa 1950. The bucket cylinder is leaking where the rod passes through the gland. I've removed the cylinder from the machine, and removed the 4 cylinder tie rods which were fastened to the glands with 1/2-20 hex nuts. The cylinder glands are pressed into the cylinder bore and sealed to the bore with o rings. The tie rods hold the glands in place. The glands are not threaded. I was able to pull the rear gland (the end without which the rod passes through) off the end of the cylinder by holding the rear gland with a chain fastened to a tree, then pulling on the rod with a tractor. The front gland and rod stayed fastened to the cylinder. Now I am stumped with how to get the front gland off. Do you have any suggestions on how I should proceed?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 2 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Are you using an old spline to be sure the clutch plate is aligned properly, Roger?

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      Roger 2 years ago

      I am putting my clutch back in my 580c backhoe and it's not going in correctly, any suggestions?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      After placing the rubber seal in the groove you must flex the odd seal where it is broken and it should slip over the piston if you have the correct seal.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      The middle seal in my photo is segmented and has to be slightly stretched where the segment appears before it can be placed in the middle groove over a rubber seal. This seal may not be exactly like the one on your piston however. Hope this helps out, Chase.

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      Chase Smith 3 years ago

      Look at your pic that says piston with new seals its the one in the middle that im having issues with

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      Chase Smith 3 years ago

      I have the same piston gland as the one shown up there its the seal in the middle that has another seal under it, but the one im having problems with is the one that looks like wL's laying on the side that are joined together I don't really know how to describe it

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 3 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello Chase, can you point out a similar piece in the above photos? I'm not sure which seal is giving you the problem.

      Randy

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      Chase Smith 3 years ago

      Hey Im actually changing out the seals in mine as I type but im having problems trying to figure out how to change the seal that's in the center of the piston the one that's pre cut (looks like a puzzle piece) it keeps breaking when I try to put the new one on what am I doing wrong and how do I get the SOB on this makes my 2nd seal for the center, and from what I can tell my piston doesn't break apart to put it on that way. (1983 Case 580D)

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      Phil 4 years ago

      Thanks for responding

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Sorry Phil, but I'm not very familiar with the mechanics of the drive train on the 580C. I had a similar problem a while back on my 580C but the transmission was simply low on fluid. Wish I could help you out! :)

      Randy

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      Phil 4 years ago

      Randy, I have a Case 580C with power shuttle I have an oil leak running out of the torque converter cover. I replaced the front seal on the power shuttle but it still leaks. Also when in high gear it will hardly pull we installed new power shuttle kit but still pulls down going up a rise. Do you have any suggestions. (Need Help)

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello MizBejabbers, backhoes seem to need constant work on them to keep them going, but are very handy to have when you need them. I still have no brakes on mine to speak of and simply use the forward/reverse shifter in a pinch. Gonna repair the brakes when I get the chance, but like Mr. B, I don't get around like I used to.

      Checked out your home hub and left a comment there. Thanks for the input and for your time. :)

      --RG

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 4 years ago

      Randy, as a commenter put it, a repair manual probably couldn’t have stated it better. We have a 1973 Ford with backhoe and front end loader, I forget the model, but it is homogonous. When we bought it, Mr. B had to replace all the hydraulic hoses on it. We bought it, sight unseen, to dig up and repair our underground house (can’t link to my hub, of course, but there are some photos of the backhoe working from the side). Mr. B said it was too big and heavy to risk putting on top of our house, and I urged him to sell it and buy a smaller one. But alas, we’ve had it for 10 years and the house still hasn’t been dug up and still leaks. It now needs a brake job, but Mr. B has knee replacement surgery pending. We may have to sell it as is because his days of playing with the backhoe may be over. Voted you up and useful.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Fantastic, Tom! Always great to hear a reader's hydraulic cylinder repair or rebuild went well. Good to know a pipe wrench may be used on some cylinder glands as making or acquiring special tools can take time and money.

      Thanks again for reporting your success and glad to be of assistance.

      Randy

    • profile image

      Tom 4 years ago

      Randy...... like you I'm late getting back on here. I rebuilt my hoe boom cylinder the same day I first wrote on this page. All went great. I used a 36" pipe wrench to back off the gland. It went really good too. just have to be very careful not to slip off that narrow edge of the gland nut. thanks again for the help.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Sorry to take so long getting back to you Tom, but was away playing a rare game of golf today. Don't ask what I shot! LOL! Please do come back and report how the repair job went as others may benefit from your experience.

      I appreciate your kind words about my father as he was a great man and you are correct in that my pride for his service is hard to measure in words. Thanks so much for reading and commenting on this article, it makes writing it more than worthwhile to me.

      Randy Godwin

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      Tom 4 years ago

      Thanks for the fast response Randy. I will let you know how my seal replacement goes. I'm hoping my good fortune or mistakes will help others who visit your page. I also want to mention I read the blogs about your father and the other WWII vets. There are still a few around ( saw a pic of a guy yesterday on the news that survived the Arizona). I wish alot more of us appreciated those men and women that served, perished and survived that time. We are so previliged to have all that their sacrifices have given us. I can only imagine your pride of your father. Great stuff. By the looks of the help you offer here it looks like he raised a good kid. Thanks amigo.... now off to the hoe!

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 4 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi Tom. If you are sure you have the correct seal kit and pay attention to how the old seals are placed I foresee no problems with your repair. As long as you don't mar the threads securing the gland to the cylinder, a pipe wrench may be used if you think it will do the job.

      Thanks for the question!

      Randy

    • profile image

      Tom 4 years ago

      Randy...... first off thanks for such a great web page and all the help you are handing out to us equipment guys. i have a 1984 case 580se and have the kit I got off ebay to redo boom cylinder seals. Do you think i can do it without a schematic of proper assembly? kit did not have one. Also is it safe to unscrew gland with large pipe wrench? thanks in advancxe for any help... TD

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi MF Man. Yes, you may find some parts numbers when you dis assemble the cylinder. You should also be able to use a micrometer to find the correct size seals for it if you cannot find the make of the cylinder. Around here we have several places which can match the parts up but not sure if that is the case where you are from.

      Look online and good luck with your repairs. Thanks for the question and for reading this article.

      Randy

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      MF man 5 years ago

      Hey guys! Great post-article, I don't have the Case(as pictured here,wish Idid) I do have a Massey Ferg 50A tractor...what a tank! Up to this time I've sent out the cyl to be rebuilt. However now , I may tackle this on my own! OK that said, everybody sittin' down?

      I also have a Massey Ferg 20hp compact tractor. It was bare so I bought a Yanmar with a front end loader and a PTO run backhoe! I transferred those two things to this Massey...works great! sold the Yanmar bare with finish mower! Ok that's the history now the fun part. I've got NO IDEA what the make of my backhoe is? I can't find plates or names anywhere!

      All I want to do is rebuild a ...looks like a 2 inch cyl for the boom. Will there be a number on that cyl? if so where do I look with all that paint? Will that help me get parts? If not I don't mind takin' apart first and layin' all the parts in order...and messure them for the fit of seals...rings...what have you. Is there any site that will sell by measurement? Many times I've gone to Napa with seals and u-joints off ole' vehicles and we messure it right up!????

      I did notice there are a few sites...I could..might be able to just buy the whole cyl between 1-2 bills...but I am a hands on kinda guy...I think the small cyl would be a great way to get my feet wet...

      The biggest challenge I find is findin' the parts, I just think it is the best...to rebuild or fix something vs cave in to this "throw away market" we have...

      Thanks, any ideas here appreciated! MFman!

    • WD Curry 111 profile image

      WD Curry 111 5 years ago from Space Coast

      You will have a long and fruitful life.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Ha WD! I can't see you spending your life trimming palms. Maybe reading palms I could believe. LOL! Yes, this hub has garnered almost 70,000 views so far and has sold quite a few products too. It used to be ranked #1 on a Google search before I got slammed a year ago but it still gets fair traffic now.

      You may be like me. My dad said I could tear up an anvil in a plowed field. :) Thanks for stopping by, Chip.

      SSSSS

    • WD Curry 111 profile image

      WD Curry 111 5 years ago from Space Coast

      How did I miss all of these how to hubs? They are brilliant. That's the gig here, right? You should be killing it with this one. I worked for a landscaping company for 6 months once (between jobs, freelance work scarce). The owner got mad when I tore up his backhoe clearing traveler palms (grow everywhere as well as along underground) and gnarly junk like that from a pristine piece of scrub habitat. It looks like it needs to be cleared and developed to Yankees.

      We were clearing it by hand with an illegal crew. I saved him two days of illegal labor pay before I broke the thing. It was the first time I ever used one. They left it at the site and one of the crew knew how to start it without the key (no problemo, amigo). He showed me how to work the levers , but refused to do it himself. He wasn't as dumb as I look. I did okay until my borderline dyslexia caught up with me.

      On the upside, the Mexicans got a good laugh. I wish I had this hub. He would have never known. But then, I might still be trimming palms.

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Ha! Welcome to the world of construction and farming equipment, Bill! Fix one thing, get ready to repair another! But it's all part of the business! Thanks for your report and good luck getting going again! Toys for boys are indeed expensive! LOL!

      Randy

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      prairiecreekbill 5 years ago

      Hi Randy, Finally got the pin out of stabilizer cylinder. Tried a new rosebud heating torch and heated every thing as best we could. Beat with sledge , it didn't budge . Mechanic friend said next step was to cut it out with torch, so I took it to local blacksmith to do that. Did good job. Buuut on the way home in fast road gear the front 4x4 drive shaft came all apart. Now front stub shaft ,pinion on inside,has side play and ruined seal. Needs new bearings. Parts dealer printed picture and said it should just pull out. It doesn't. Just started on this part ,so will try something else after dinner.Toys are expensive. Thanks for your input. Bill

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks so much for this info, prariecreekbill! Since I've never ran into this problem before your response will no doubt help others experiencing the same thing. I know what you mean about slowing down a bit, Bill. The mustard seems harder to cut now at my age--61--than it once was!LOL!

      Thanks again and stop by any time!

      Randy

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      prariecreekbill 5 years ago

      Hey Randy, I called my friend just now to clarify what to heat, yoke or pin. He says heat yoke red hot. beat with sledge. Wont break. If it doesn't come out I will just keep adding oil. He works on these all the time and I trust him completely. Thanks for your input. I will post later when have something. I'm 80 years old and kind of take it slow sometimes. Bill

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks for the response, Bill! I would think your friend meant the pin because there's no danger of ruining the yoke.

      15 degrees! Wow, I have the A/C running at the moment! Please do check back when it's a bit warmer!

      Randy

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      prairiecreekbill 5 years ago

      Randy, Thanks for quick response. After I posted to you I called a friend who is a cat and case mechanic, he says this is common and to heat it red hot. Do not know if he meant yoke or pin. will find out . I will certainly let you know. 15 deg. out now so I will postpone job for warmer weather.Breaking the yoke freaks me out. As my father said ,I am working in shade tree garage . Stay Tuned Bill

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 5 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hello PRARIECREEKBILL! I have observed some of these being spot welded instead of using the "C" clip to hold the pin in place, but I assume you would have noticed this before posting here.

      I've never had any problem with this so I can only make suggestions at this point. While heating the pin is a last resort, this may be better than beating or using a press to remove it because it may break the yoke of the piston rod which will require a bit of cash or a new cylinder to repair it.

      I would heat the pin, not the yoke, if heat is needed. Please check back and tell me what you finally did, if you don't mind. This is a new one on me!

      Thanks for the question and for reading this article.

      Randy Godwin

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      PRARIECREEKBILL 5 years ago

      ON CASE 580K HAVING TROUBLE GETTING PIN OUT OF STABILIZER CYLINDER. The one on end . cylinder to foot. Heat it,beat it or press it? Bill

      .

    • Randy Godwin profile image
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      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @Victoryfiber-It might be trapped air causing this but I've never ran into this particular problem before. You might try slightly loosening the hose from the cylinder with the engine switched off to see if the cylinder will expel the trapped air.

      I will check for other problems in the meantime. If you find the problem please let me know what you discovered. Thanks and good luck!

      Randy Godwin

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      victoryfiber@bellsouth.net 6 years ago

      I had the cyl on my front end loader rebuilt (backhoe)Installed it but my bucket will not come all the way down to the ground it misses by 8 inches. What would cause this. Air? and if so how do I bleed it out?

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Thanks so much for your kind comments, Douglas. My dad was indeed a great man and I hope he was proud of me when he was alive. I think he was okay with the way I turned out too!

      And thanks for telling me the article was easy to follow, as this was my main focus. I wanted to help small farmers and other machine owners save money and time on hydraulic repairs.

      You have a great old machine in the Case 580SE. A little care and maintenance and it will last longer than you and I will! LOL!

      Thanks again and good luck! Please feel free to ask me for any info I may be able to provide concerning your Case.

      Randy

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      Douglas 6 years ago

      Hi Randy, First off, I would like to commend you on such an awesome explanation of seal rebuild. I doubt there is a manual in exsistance that could do a better job of explaning this special task. Secondly, I salute you and your father for serving under a legend like Patton and only you and God know and appreciate what you have learned from such a great person/leader like your father. WOW, D-day. I am retired military and truly appreciate what your father did for me. Lastly, I just purchased a Case 580SE Construction King which I am told is 1985. I am looking at doing some repinning, at least one seal repair and some other things to tighten up the old machine. It runs like a top, and performs great, just like me, old and needs a little tweeking. Thanks again Randy, you are awesome, Doug

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Hi John,

      I wish I could see the gland to give you better info on your problem. Are you sure you have the correct kit or that the gland isn't a 2 piece type gland? I have ordered what I thought was the correct seal kit, but found out later there were several different types of cylinders used for the same purpose on my Case.

      Some of the gland seals are very difficult to slide over the gland and into the proper groove. You'll think they won't go, but if carefully maneuvered, they will slide over the other grooves without breaking. The Case dealer near you can give you an enlargement of the parts and possibly advice too, if you think it would help.

      Any more info you can give me might help me better understand the problem, John. Feel free to ask me here.

      Thanks for reading and good luck on your rebuild!

      Randy

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      John Hess 6 years ago

      Hi, thank you for your article. I disassembled a Case 1845C bucket cylinder and found the inner U-seal in the gland was very difficult to remove. Once removed, I do not see how the new U-seal should be inserted into the middle of the gland since both ends of the gland are much smaller than the seal itself. I do not want to damage the new seal, do you know a proper way to insert it? Thank You

    • Randy Godwin profile image
      Author

      Randy Godwin 6 years ago from Southern Georgia

      @ G Haady- I really appreciate your comments, G! I'm glad to know these articles are of help to those who want to repair their own equipment and save both time and money.

      Plus, many of us enjoy keeping our old machines going and learning new repair techniques. In case you didn't notice, I have another, more detailed hydraualic article here on HubPages.

      Good luck on your hydraulic cylinder repairs and please stop by again if you need other assistance. :)

      Randy

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      G Haady 6 years ago

      Well, what can i say. I just bought a 2nd hand super l case machine 2 months ago and today i got the boom hydraulic gland off few cm from its track. I'm cracking my head to find a tool to tighten it up and thanks god I find this page about making my own DIY set. Thank to you Randy Godwin for your article. It is very helpful and easy to understand. Those pictures are brilliant! It's a real pleasure to have people like you over the internet. Many thanks.

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      Randy Godwin 7 years ago from Southern Georgia

      My father landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day, fought in the Battle of the Bulge under Patton, and helped free the Nazi death camps. How could I not have learned some bit of solidity being reared by him? Yes, our fathers were a different breed of men! Thanks again LJ!

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      lightning john 7 years ago from Florida

      Men, like our fathers are what made this country great, and strong. We need to carry on that iron-hard tradition of integrity, ethics, and quality!

      I knew there was something solid about your character, just from reading your comments in the forums.

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      Randy Godwin 7 years ago from Southern Georgia

      Your dad reminds me of mine, LJ! It never got too cold or hot to work and only a few holidays were exempt from work day. I always though Thanksgiving was for digging sweet potatoes! Running a farm impels one to learn how to do many things such as welding and machine repair.

      Thanks for bringing back the memories of my dad and for commenting on my article!

      Randy

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      lightning john 7 years ago from Florida

      My Dad had a land clearing business, and we did all of our own repairs. When I was 10 he put a rod and +lead in my hand, had me learn to weld up those front idlers for the tracks on the Cat doziers. The East Texas sand really wears out the parts.

      We single handed replaced a hydrolic clutch in a D-8 Cat on Thanksgiving day when I was 13. It was freezing cold, but that's just the way my Pop was, and I'm glad I was raised that way because everything now is a piece of cake.

      Thanks for sharing this information! It really brings back memories!