Replacing Sway Bar Links on a Nissan Titan

Updated on September 25, 2017

Your car's suspension is exposed to all kinds of rugged road conditions that can cause havoc on its components. The normal wear-and-tear or, as in this case, user error can require parts needing to be replaced.

I recently swapped out my front shocks and coil springs on my Nissan Titan. In the process I 'boogered' up one of the OEM sway bar links on the passenger side. Since these links are easily accesible and relatively inexpensive, I went ahead and ordered a Moog replacement part off Amazon.

SIDE NOTE: If you choose to do this replacement yourself, be sure to ask if what you're ordering comes with 1 unit or 2. In my opinion, both parts might as well be replaced at the same time. And that was my intention. However, when the part arrived I was surprised to find that only one unit came in the kit instead of two. Technically, since I only needed one, I just went with it. Here's how it went.

Moog K750146 Sway Bar Link Kit
Moog K750146 Sway Bar Link Kit

This is a pretty easy part swap, assuming you have some basic mechanical knowledge and basic hand tools. I spent roughly 30 minutes, at a casual pace, on this including taking the pictures. Here's what you need to get this job accomplished:

  • Replacement Sway Bar Links
  • Jack Stands
  • Hydraulic Jack
  • Impact Wrench (optional, but will help speed up the process)
  • 13/16" deep socket (for wheel removal)
  • 17mm deep socket (for use on impact wrench, if available)
  • Vise Grips
  • 17mm wrench (a ratchet wrench would be extremely handy for this)

Step 1.

Safely raise and support the vehicle in preparation to remove the wheel.
Safely raise and support the vehicle in preparation to remove the wheel.

Step 2.

With the truck supported, use a 13/16" deep socket to remove the wheel.
With the truck supported, use a 13/16" deep socket to remove the wheel.

Step 3.

Carefully turn the wheel outward to gain enough space to work on the sway bar link.
Carefully turn the wheel outward to gain enough space to work on the sway bar link.

Step 4.

Remove the two bolts highlighted in the photo above with a 17mm wrench. A vise grip may need to be used to prevent turning. Remove old link after nut removal.
Remove the two bolts highlighted in the photo above with a 17mm wrench. A vise grip may need to be used to prevent turning. Remove old link after nut removal.

Step 5.

Insert the new sway bar link, being careful not to ding the threads. A jack may need to be used to raise the lower control arm into position. The bolts of the links should slide right in.
Insert the new sway bar link, being careful not to ding the threads. A jack may need to be used to raise the lower control arm into position. The bolts of the links should slide right in.

Step 6.

Tighten the nuts down on the sway bar link bolts. Use the 17mm wrench and vise grips to ensure tightness. Nissan recommends 42 ft- lb. of torque on each nut.
Tighten the nuts down on the sway bar link bolts. Use the 17mm wrench and vise grips to ensure tightness. Nissan recommends 42 ft- lb. of torque on each nut.

Step 7.

Finished!! Spend a moment adoring your work, then reinstall your tire, lower your truck, and clean up your tools.
Finished!! Spend a moment adoring your work, then reinstall your tire, lower your truck, and clean up your tools.
OEM Link compared to Moog Link
OEM Link compared to Moog Link

Here's a side-by-side comparison of the Nissan OEM sway bar link (bottom) compared to the new Moog sway bar link (top).

When upgrading the suspension components a few weeks ago, I inadvertently stripped the threads of the bolt and/or nut of the top bolt. I couldn't get the bolt to loosen or tighten, so I drove the truck for about a week with the top bolt loose waiting for the part to arrive and the time to install it.

During that time, my truck made horrific sounds going over bumps and rode quite poorly. It appears that the OEM bolt was under a significant strain during this time as you can see that it has been bent quite a bit.

You may also notice that one of the bolts of the OEM link appears to be melted. It in fact has been torched. I put about 30 seconds worth of effort into trying to remove the nut manually with no luck, so I moved on to the torch for a much quicker positive result. If you choose the torch method be sure to keep the flame away from the CV Axle Boot (assuming you have a 4x4). If you damage the boot it will need to be replaced rather quickly to prevent major mechanical damage.

Nissan Titan Front Suspension Schematic:

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