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How to Change a Flat Tyre on the Toyota Auris

Updated on December 30, 2016
Flat rear tyre on my Toyota!
Flat rear tyre on my Toyota!

Here is how I changed my flat tyre on my Toyota Auris. As with all occasional maintenance tasks it has a number of little trips, traps and eventual disappointment.

First of all - is the tyre really flat?

Sadly, yes it was. Although I visited not one but two service stations and used their compressed air pump - I could not re-inflate the tyre sufficiently. As well as being flat it may have a valve problem.

On top of that - the tyre place was shut. So I had no choice but to change the tyre.

Yep - that tyre is definitely flat.  Bother it.
Yep - that tyre is definitely flat. Bother it.
Picture of boot - now where's that tyre?
Picture of boot - now where's that tyre?

Get All The Equipment Ready

The relative wisdom of experience says to get everything prepared and ready before starting any job.

So initially it was a case of locating the parts - this being the first time I have changed a tyre on this model of car.

The spare is obviously in the boot - there being nowhere else to put it. I found the spare under the boot cover.

Unfortunately - it is a space saving tyre - which means this is going to be a temporary replacement only.

Space saving spare tyre - how disappointing
Space saving spare tyre - how disappointing
Unscrewing the spare tyre retainer
Unscrewing the spare tyre retainer
Tool bag in tyre recess
Tool bag in tyre recess

Tyre Tools

The tyre tools are under the spare tyre in the boot.

The jack is hidden away in the right hand boot storage compartment.

Turn its screw slightly so it can be removed from its holding position.

Tyre tools - spanner, jack handle and... tow bar thing.
Tyre tools - spanner, jack handle and... tow bar thing.
The jack is hidden away in the right hand boot compartment
The jack is hidden away in the right hand boot compartment
Use the two little indentations to position the jack which goes either side of that ridge.
Use the two little indentations to position the jack which goes either side of that ridge.

Locating the Jack on the Car

Under the car is a ridge that runs the length of the body.

Look for identifying marks or notches.

I 'think' the two indentations shown in the picture are the right place to locate the jack - and that is what I used.

Jack in position and ready to go
Jack in position and ready to go
Locking wheel nut box
Locking wheel nut box

Locking Wheel Nuts

I don't know why they bother with this stuff. I suppose some people have expensive wheels and they live in places where they might get stolen. I don't.

If you have an odd looking nut on your wheels then you probably have locking wheel nuts. The box could generally be anywhere - it is fairly small - but a popular place is rattling around in the glove compartment.

Identify the socket and the nut on the wheel. It is fairly obvious how it works.

The locking wheel nut collection
The locking wheel nut collection
The locking wheel nut socket
The locking wheel nut socket
Locking wheel nut showing the teeth locators
Locking wheel nut showing the teeth locators
Comparison of original tyre and space-saving temporary replacement tyre
Comparison of original tyre and space-saving temporary replacement tyre

Space Saving Tyres

These are a great idea if you never ever have to use them.

Then they are a complete waste of time and effort. I don't want to have change my tyres twice. Put the spare on and continue driving is the old-fashioned way.

With space-savers - they will get you where you need to go. They will also need changing at the first opportunity as they are for emergency use only. They are not particularly safe or suitable for your vehicle.

Old tyre removed
Old tyre removed
Jack and spare tyre in position
Jack and spare tyre in position

Changing the Wheel

Use the jack to slightly lift the car. Do NOT lift the wheel off the ground yet. Make sure the car and jack seem to be a solid and safe fit.

Now use the tyre spanner to loosen SLIGHTLY the bolts holding the old tyre on. The point of this is to make sure they all can be loosened. There is no point in jacking up the car, taking four nuts off and discovering you cannot remove the last one. Yes. It does happen.

When all the nuts, including the locking one, are slightly loosened - use the jack to raise the car so the wheel is free from the ground.

Undo all the nuts and pull the wheel off. Do not force or shake anything. There is a small piece of metal (the jack) holding up the weight of the car. Do not do anything stupid.

Move the old wheel completely out of the way. Bring the spare type into position. Use minimum force to put the tyre onto the car. Do the bolts up finger tight to start with and then takes turns to gently tighten them with the spanner.

Continue until the wheel looks and feels solid.

Lower the jack carefully keeping a close eye on the car, wheel, tyres and your toes.

When the jack is completely lowered recheck all the bolts with your spanner.

Take the car for a short gentle hundred yard trip with the stereo off so you can listen for any odd sounds. When you stop recheck the tyre bolts again.

Pack the tools away and wash hands. The old tyre will not fit in the boot space so you will have to leave it flat in the boot or elsewhere for now until you get it replaced properly.

Drive with caution on the space-saving spare.

Spare tyre now installed.
Spare tyre now installed.

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