How to Fix a Loose Sun Visor

Updated on April 30, 2017
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Loose Sun Visor?

You are driving along the highway and all of a sudden you hit a pothole, your vehicle makes a loud thud, and your sun visor pops down to get in your way. You frantically push it away from your line of vision as you swerve in the road. Finally, you get it back up as you cuss beneath your breath. Unfortunately for you, the improperly maintained highway you’re driving on is riddled with holes. Sound familiar? This is my tutorial on how to fix a loose car or truck visor.

Remedy for a Loose Sun Visor

My solution to this problem was hard to come by as the answers you get pertain to specific makes and models. This is my solution to the problem on a Dodge Ram 1500, all though it may work on other vehicles as well. A lot of the answers on the internet were suggesting fixing it internally, this seemed quite complicated to the “not so handyman” and essentially, you wouldn’t know if it worked until you tried it. In turn, this could potential make the problem worse. If you are like most people, you might ask “Well, how much can they cost to replace”? For a new sun visor, you are looking at $50.00-$100.00. A used one can go for around $30.00, but, I personally would avoid a used visor as it may have the same problem (or may soon have it).

This is why I am going to teach you here and now how to fix it yourself. First, you will need to detach your visor from the vehicle. It will be easy as it is held up by a few screws (three, on a Dodge Ram). You will need to remove it if you plan on replacing it or fixing it. Now, to see if my method will work for your car or truck you will simply clamp the “top” of the visor just underneath the bar. Make sure you put plenty of pressure on it. Then, try to rotate the visor. If there is a good amount of resistance, more than there was before, my method will work for you.

Tools You Will Need

  • Hand Drill
  • 2 Bolts
  • 2 Locking Washers
  • 4 Flat Washers
  • 2 Nuts
  • Dremel tool with cutoff tool (Optional)

If you do not own a hand drill, you can borrow one, rent one, or buy one for the amount you would have spent on a new sun visor.

Steps to Follow When Repairing Your Visor

Step 1: Drill one hole 1/2 inch from the top directly under the bar. Make sure it is 2 inches from the anchor that connects to the ceiling. Make sure you start the drill out slowly so that you don’t snag and rip the cloth.

You can see why it is important to keep the drill at a slow speed and to unhook snags. The second one turned out much better.
You can see why it is important to keep the drill at a slow speed and to unhook snags. The second one turned out much better.

Step 2: Place a flat washer on top of the hole and insert a bolt through the washer and the hole. Ensure that the head of the bolt faces toward the ceiling for a more attractive solution. On the opposing side you will want to place another flat washer. This allows the pressure to be distributed evenly throughout the visor. On top of the flat washer you will want to place your locking washer to keep the nut in place. Lastly, you will want to place your nut above the locking washer. You will then tighten the nut while holding the bolt in place until the visor is no longer loose.

Step 3: This step will further ensure that your visor is held in place. You will repeat what you did in step one and two about 1-2 inches from the first hole.

Step 4: Take your Dremel tool and saw off the excess bolt just above the nut. This is optional, but will provide you with a sleek look.

Thie procedure will ensure that you don’t have any on-the-road mishaps again. If the visor begins to loosen you can tighten the nuts or just follow the steps in a different location.

Now, originally this was a sliding sun visor. I am not sure at this point if you will be able to slide it or not. I would urge you to keep it in place to prevent further loosening.

The sun visor loosening is a very common problem in a large number of vehicles. Don’t pay for a new one, fix it yourself!

Comments

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    • Entourage_007 profile image

      Stuart 

      21 months ago from Santa Barbara, CA

      Great article, this has definitely been a problem that I have had to deal with a few times in my prior cars.

    • profile image

      Joe 

      4 years ago

      That's a reckneck way to fix it.

    • profile image

      Neojeo 

      4 years ago

      I tried everything tape, Velcro

      The visor kept getting looser!!

      This remedy is genius I cannot thank you for this solution to a frustrating problem. I have a 2002 Malibu & found that the visor just pulled off.

      Had to pullback the fabric to see the best place to place the screw .I used an iron on sticker to cover & made the fabric look better. Bless you

    • profile image

      Rambo 

      4 years ago

      Excellent post for the sun visor repair. I followed your instructions and it is as good as new. Thanks!!

    • eHealer profile image

      Deborah 

      6 years ago from Las Vegas

      Useful information and great pics. I need to fix my visor (it's been over a year) and I think I'm finally motivated to do it! Lol. Voted up!

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