How to Remove an Alternator from a 91-94 Mercury Capri

Updated on May 28, 2018
The arrows indicate items that need to be removed and disconnected.
The arrows indicate items that need to be removed and disconnected.

Sooner or later, the owner of a 1991-94 Mercury Capri will experience one of several signs that the alternator is going bad. Do not rely on the mileage on the car, some are bad at 60, 80, 150,000 miles. If you see the voltage gauge shift between the 12-14V as you drive, or remain at the 12V for a time and then rise to 14V, or, if you hear odd metallic sounds or rattles, or if overnight, your battery is dead when everything is off, it is likely the alternator is going bad and sooner than later more catastrophic events prevail. The regulator inside maybe failing, one of the diodes may be failing, the brushes inside are not functioning correctly due to age and wear, bearings are shot, or the pulley attached becomes unattached and the belt has problems turning.

On a 1991-94 Mercury Capri, good quality alternators, either Bosch or Mitsubishi, cost anywhere from $130-200. They are all rebuilt. Spending less than that is like, "you get what you pay for", meaning, it could fail (despite a year warranty) within days of installation (like mine did, I bought it on Ebay for $65).

Capri service manuals will tell you to remove the alternator from the top and to remove the Intake Air Control (IAC) and hoses attached. Alldata tells you to disconnect the cat converter, and exhaust and the oil filter. From the top, it takes about 1 hr, depending on how things go. The Alldata method takes 2 hrs and depending on the rust issues, could take much longer.

To remove the alternator, do the following:

1. Disconnect battery-the negative connection.

2.Locate the IAC (see photo). This is a self contained unit attached to the engine block by two bolts. It has two narrow hoses (with coolant) and two wide hoses attached. There is an electronic connector on top.

2. Remove the two bolts. Disconnect and push aside the hoses. Do not disconnect the electronic connector. Disconnecting the narrow hoses may have coolant drip out.

3. Pull out and set aside or completely remove the IAC. Directly below is the alternator with plenty of room.

4. Remove the three alternator bolts, with the bottom bolt being last. You may have to remove the alternator bracket, if you do, do this before unbolting the bottom bolt, which is hard to see from the top.

5. With bolts removed, the alternator will easily lift out. To install the new one, reverse the steps. Make sure you connect the cables to the new alt first.

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    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      4 years ago

      Yes, the alt is a pain to remove from the top or bottom. With the car on a lift, from the bottom took about 1 hr or so.

    • profile image

      DR 

      4 years ago

      Is there a part # for the alternator bracket? The one on my car appears to be to far forward at the top or maybe even too far back at the bottom. Cant find a photo of it online either. May be the wrong bracket was put in previously. Thanks.

    • profile image

      DR 

      4 years ago

      Just have to bring up to the top, then turn it and turn it until you find the way it fits out. It kinda rolls out and over the front, near the fluid lines. Trial and error, just don't force it, it comes out eventually.

    • profile image

      help 

      5 years ago

      from the bottom is the engine axle..blocking it.....the tie rod....the top is block with the AC line and power steering line.... the driver side is block by the exhaust bracket.........alternator is a trap to remove.....have anyone remover an alternator from the top?

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      5 years ago

      It may be easier to remove it from underneath on a lift rather that bending over the front.

    • profile image

      help 

      5 years ago

      my alternator is trap and no way to get it out...

    • profile image

      concerned 

      7 years ago

      You learned the hard way?? Asking for advice is hard? You stole 99% of the information in this article from facebook.

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      7 years ago

      Your're welcome

    • profile image

      yooo 

      7 years ago

      wonderful!! thanks soooo much!

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      7 years ago

      I learned the VERY hard way!

    • wereview4u profile image

      Fernando Lacerda 

      7 years ago from London, Uk

      THANK YOU FOR THE INFORMATION VERY USEFUL

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