Fixing the Driver's Door Electric Window on a Berlingo

Updated on August 10, 2017
Photo 3 shows the Electric Window Module circuit board fault - a dry solder joint at the picture centre. Close up photo below.
Photo 3 shows the Electric Window Module circuit board fault - a dry solder joint at the picture centre. Close up photo below.

Fault Presentation

Here's what to do if the driver's side electric window on the Citroen Berlingo (Mark 1) fails to operate correctly, operates intermittently, or becomes stuck in one position. The Peugeot Partner can have the same fault.

If only the driver's door electric window fails to operate or operates intermittently, the most likely cause is a fault in the Electric Window Module (ECM). The fault is most likely a bad joint in the printed circuit board (PCB) of the ECM. The repair described here addresses only that issue.

Before You Begin

Before starting your repair, make sure you have identified the problem.

  • Make sure the glass itself is not jammed by the rubber seals and runners. If it is, using spray furniture polish can unstick the glass.
  • Make sure no physical damage to the wiring boot to the door is evident.
  • If both front electric windows fail to operate, then the fault is probably not in the ECM but elsewhere in the common supply to both windows, such as the fuses, relay, or other modules.

Skills and Tools

You will need some minor abilities and tools to accomplish this fix.

Tools include:

  • flat head screwdrivers,
  • a soldering iron and solder
  • and (preferably) a magnifying glass or similar.

You will need to be able to remove the plastic cover below the steering column housing and then remove the Electric Window Module (ECM) and its cover.

You will need to have some ability with a soldering iron, including removing old solder and re-soldering existing joints.

Taking Out the Electric Window Module (ECM)

The location of the ECM is exposed by removing, on the driver's side, the plastic front panel which covers the fuses, and the lower cover. The ECM is clipped onto a plastic backplate which is clipped onto the side of the heater tower (see photo 1 below). Removal may damage the plastic clips, but that is easily remedied later. The separate lower wiring connector can be twisted off the backplate. Remove the ECM wiring plug to free the ECM from the car; note that the plug has a locking clip.

Photo 1: The Electric Window Module (ECM)

Location of the Electric Window Module (ECM) on the Citroen Berlingo (Mark 1) attached to the side of the heater assembly on the driver's side.
Location of the Electric Window Module (ECM) on the Citroen Berlingo (Mark 1) attached to the side of the heater assembly on the driver's side.

Open the ECM by using a small flat screwdriver on the black plastic clips just visible on both sides of the pale green coloured cover in photo 2 (yes, the poor colour rendition shows it as cyan). The cover clip holes can be filed slightly to assist future dismantling.

Photo 2: Electric Window Module (ECM) Parts

Photo 2  shows the ECM and its plastic backplate detached from the car.
Photo 2 shows the ECM and its plastic backplate detached from the car.

Identifying and Fixing

Inside is the ECM is the printed circuit board with components on one side and the solder joints and tracks on the other. Check the component side for burn marks or melting. If these are present, there may be an associated track burn or soldering fault that can be repaired. However component replacement is beyond the scope of this repair.

Check the soldered side of the circuit board carefully, preferably with a magnifying glass. A typical dry joint is shown near the centre of Photo 3 (close-up below of the printed circuit board), and is the most common fault. There may be more than one dry joint. Once you find it, it may be necessary to remove the old solder and clean it up before re-soldering the joint with flux-cored solder.

Photo 3: Dry Solder Joint

Close up of the fault, a dry solder joint.
Close up of the fault, a dry solder joint.

Checks and Reassembly

Re-assemble the ECM and try it out temporarily in the car just by plugging it back in. If it still doesn't work have another closer look for circuit board faults.

If the ECM works fit it back into position, using a tie-wrap (as shown in Photo 1) if the backplate clips have expired.

Questions & Answers

    © 2017 Lymond

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